Book a Cajun Cast-and-Blast Trip for Exceptional Fishing, Hunting

 

Book a Cajun Cast-and-Blast Trip for Exceptional Fishing, Hunting

By Craig Lamb

If you hunt and fish the idea of combining the better of two worlds in one trip seems impossible. There is one place you can do both, and that is in a special corner of south Louisiana.

Nowhere else can you enjoy a morning of amazing waterfowl hunting, and then spend the afternoon catching an inshore bonanza of saltwater species.

Teal, mallard, canvasback, pintail and red heads. Redfish, speckled trout, flounder, triple tail and more. Morning. Afternoon. Blast and cast.

All of it is possible with a trip to Venice, Louisiana, which sits in the middle of this ideal world, where species of saltwater and waterfowl are polarized to a location like none other.

The place to book this fantasy is Home Run Fishing Charters and Lodge, where world-class fishing and waterfowl hunting is served with world-class service, first class lodging, Cajun hospitality and gourmet dining.

Waterfowl hunters and avid anglers now have a first-time opportunity to experience a new trip package from Home Run Charters & Lodge. It’s the Blast and Cast package.

The all-inclusive package includes lodging, meals, hunting, fishing, and cleaning of fish and waterfowl. 

“This is our first year to offer a cast and blast, and it will be a first class operation, just like everything else we set forth to do,” said Glen Newell, an owner at Home Run Charters & Lodge.

Newell isn’t kidding. Home Run Charters & Lodge has access to over 10,000 acres of marsh from which to hunt. You will be safely transported to the blind with experienced guides. A well-heeled kennel of dogs assures the best of success in retrieving your birds. The blinds from which you will hunt are the best available. Best of all, you can leave the hip waders at home.

Private access to thousands of acres means lots of ducks to clean and package for the trip home. The all-inclusive package includes plucking, processing and even Cryovac vacuum packing for all ducks harvested by the hunter.

“We are the only operation that includes this service in our all-inclusive package,” added Newell.

What sets Home Run Charters & Lodge apart from every other cast and blast trip are three things. Those are location, location, and location.

“We are fortunate to be in the most prolific environment there could ever be for growing inshore species,” said Capt. John Pisa. “Our marshes and surrounding habitat also sets up a smorgasbord for waterfowl during the season.”

The Mississippi River’s confluence with the Gulf of Mexico is the reason. The magic happens in the marshes and inshore waters where the river infuses the saltwater environment with nutrients.

The Mississippi River Flyway also ends here. Habitat, favorable weather and food funnel waterfowl down the river and into the coastal marshes. From early teal migrations in September to late season mallards, the area supports the best waterfowl hunting around.

Fall is also the best time for inshore fishing. Hurricane season is over. Fishing pressure is low. The river is at its lowest and clearest of any time of year. Expect to see redfish tailing in the shallows, and sight casting adds to the allure.

Take a look around Venice, and you’ll be glad you booked at Home Run Charters & Lodge. The Lodges at Home Run Charters is not your average fish camp. Arrive, and you find elegance, comfort, and first-class service, dining, and lodging. 

Three separate lodges each have a living room, wide-screen TVs, free WiFi with a printer, dining room, bar and kitchen. You can cook your own meals or experience gourmet dining. Big pork chops, prime steaks, and Louisiana seafood, the freshest around, are on the menu.

Luxury living means the same experience for dining at the lodge. The all-inclusive plan includes a decadent five-course meal, breakfast, and a to-go lunch for the fishing day. Check out details about the lodge and dining here.

Bookings go fast, so contact us soon to make reservations. Call us at (504) 982-8862, or (504) 909-TUNA.

Click here for more about the Blast & Cast trips. Find out more about the inshore fishing by clicking here. Click here to visit homeruncharters.com and find out everything you need to know about booking a trip.

 

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

 

 

Summertime the Right Time for Red Drum

 
Summertime the Right Time for Red Drum

By Craig Lamb

Some say redfish; others say red drum. No matter where you live this powerful freight train of a saltwater species is among the most prized of all game fish.

A late summer beach vacation coincides with the best time for catching trophy reds. Jetties are prime locations and are easy for anglers to find. Use a depth finder to locate nearby drop-offs with steep inclines, from 5 up to 30 feet. Reds use the deep holes to hide, and ambush mullet washed across the shallow sides of the bottom.

Use a big, splashy topwater plug when the reds herd mullet against the jetty rocks. When they disappear switch to a Mirro-O-Lure or lipless crankbait like a Rat-L-Trap.

Your family wants beach time. Oblige them and yourself by looking out for reds on the beach. Keep a big, splashy topwater rigged and ready whenever your boat is beached. Big redfish will herd baitfish, such as mullet, and push them toward the shore. The presence of diving birds is always a good sign of redfish action.

In the Carolinas, red drum, as they are called, are targeted by anglers during the flood tide. That is when high waters push red drum shallow to feed on mud and flats that normally are dry. The abundance of nutrients and food is the draw, and so is the cover of Spartina Grass.

The fish are easy to spot with the tips of their tails wagging across the surface. Finding the fish is the easy part. The challenge is making precise presentations. Keeping the bait within the path of vision is key. Cast ahead of the fish—far enough to adjust the path toward the fish—without landing it too close to spook.

An ideal boat for hunting down redfish (or red drum) is the 218 DLV by Carolina Skiff. The boat is a standout because this rig combines the best features of two boats into one. Those are a bay boat for handling the chop, with a shallow draft, skiff-style boat that can take you into the skinny water where inshore fish feed.

This design gives anglers the better of both worlds. The 21 DLV provides access up into coastal rivers and even into shallower tidal creeks without worry. The modified Tri-V hull, wide beam and extremely shallow draft keep the boat from sliding in tight turns or even running aground on shallow runs.

The 218 DLV has a length overall of 20’ 10.” A wide beam spanning 98” provides stability and plenty of room for fishing. The boat weighs 1,773 pounds with a maximum weight capacity of 2,700 pounds. Rated for 150 horsepower, the 218 DLV can be rigged for power and fuel economy with today’s performance designed four-stroke outboards.

Step aboard the 218 DLV and you discover how Carolina Skiff designed this serious fishing rig for saltwater anglers, fishing shallow and deep. A wide open deck and cockpit allows plenty of elbow room for multiple anglers to cast, troll and fight fish. The front and rear casting decks offer abundant room for taking the stealth approach when casting to tailing reds in skinny water.

Durability is a foundation of all Carolina Skiff models. Patented box-beam construction produces a solid, durable, no-flexing hull that is completely wood free. You get peace of mind and years of enjoyment knowing that quality construction is a priority at Carolina Skiff.

Get even more peace of mind from the foam floatation used in the hull that exceeds U.S. Coast Guard requirements. Foam flotation exceeds Coast Guard requirements, providing positive flotation for shallow draft and quick-planning characteristics. Using more flotation than necessary also creates sound-deadening properties that make the ride smoother and quieter.

Ready to build and customize a 218 DLV? Get started using the Build A Boat tool. Visit carolinaskiff.com today . Join the community of Carolina Skiff followers at the Carolina Skiff Facebook Page.

 

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

 

Summertime is Flounder Time

 

Summertime is Flounder Time

By Craig Lamb

Everyone likes a bargain, and you get a two-for-one deal when fishing for flounder. The mild, delicate taste of flounder is highly valued by seafood lovers. For sporting value, you can’t beat the fight put up by a doormat-sized flounder. Tasty and sporting, the flounder is a favorite of saltwater anglers.

Understanding the basics of flounder biology is essential to catching this unique species. Flounder are bottom feeders. So that aspect alone eliminates most of the water column, making it easier to begin your search.

By body design, flounder are not built for speed, something else to keep in mind when choosing baits and retrieves. Fishing bottom bouncing live bait rigs, slowly, is a proven tactic. Flounder feed by stealth under cover of their mottled camouflage skin that conceals them from being noticed by their prey.

During summer the rising water temperatures bring flounder into shallower water. Use that to your advantage on the low tide by exploring the exposed bottoms where flounder like to gather into schools. Remember that flounder are opportunistic feeders, not predators. Key areas are calm waters buffered from strong currents that provide refuge for baitfish.

Take advantage of low tide times to search for flounder areas. Deep holes surrounded by the exposed sandy flats on low tide are prime spots when the tide comes in. Bridges, edges of jetties or most any manmade structure that provides a current break are more ideal places to drop a live bait rig.

The “flicker rig,” a modified version of the standard fish-finder rig, is an all-around fish catcher for flounder. To make it, run the main line through an egg sinker. Tie one end of the line to a barrel swivel. Then make a leader on the opposite side of the swivel. Tie a two-foot section of line. Then add a spinner braced by a few red beads on each side. Complete the rig with a hook. You can add a float to the leader for shallow water fishing. By far, live bait is the best choice for attracting the slow moving, wary flounder. 

What else is fun about flounder fishing in the summer, and a hands-down benefit of a JV 20 CC, is the end of summer migration. Flounder move into extremely shallow water to feed at night. For even more sporting fun try the nocturnal approach. You’ll need a spotlight and flounder gig to make the most of the trip.

Getting into flounder territory takes a boat that can run in the skinniest of water while handling bay chop. Traversing ultra-shallow flats and maneuvering turns in tight channels sum up the demands of a boat for flounder fishing.

The 20 JVX CC by Carolina Skiff gets you there in style, safety, functionality, and performance. With a length overall of 20 feet and a beam of 78 inches, this boat provides a great balance of functional size and performance. Weight overall is 1,230 pounds, and with a draft of about 4 inches, the 20 JVX CC is made for cruising the flats without the worry of running aground. A maximum horsepower rating of 90 H.P. makes the perfect setup for matching fuel economy with performance.

A lightweight hull and modified V-hull design combine for a boat that will carry more, go further and faster with less horsepower. That sums up the performance and economy features so important in a skiff.

The JVX Series provides excellent maneuverability and handling with the positive tracking keels. Patented splash guards provide the smooth, dry ride that Carolina Skiff has been known for after 30 years and counting in the business.

Durability is a foundation of all Carolina Skiff models. Patented box-beam construction produces a solid, durable, no-flexing hull that is completely wood free. You get peace of mind and years of enjoyment knowing that quality construction is a priority at Carolina Skiff.

Get even more peace of mind from the foam floatation used in the hull that exceeds U.S. Coast Guard requirements. Foam flotation exceeds Coast Guard requirements, providing positive flotation for shallow draft and quick-planning characteristics. Using more flotation than necessary also creates sound-deadening properties that make the ride smoother and quieter.

Ready to build and customize a 20 JVX CC? Get started using the Build A Boat tool. Visit Carolina Skiff at carolinaskiff.com . Join the community of Carolina Skiff followers at the Carolina Skiff Facebook Page.

 

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

 

Something for Everyone at Home Run Fishing Charters and Lodge

 

Something for Everyone at Home Run Fishing Charters and Lodge

By Craig Lamb

Hooking up to freight train runs with a bull-sized redfish. Airborne largemouth on topwaters. Getting sore-armed from catching fat speckled trout. And all of those species caught from the same spot.

Sounds impossible. In the inshore waters of Louisiana, and around the saltwater fishing capital of Venice, that is a reality.

 

The most fertile fishing grounds in the U.S. are located here. The magic happens in the marshes and inshore waters where the mighty Mississippi River infuses the saltwater environment with nutrients. The sum of the whole is some of the best fishing for inshore species, and even freshwater largemouth, in the world.

Travel to Venice, and you will find a town filled with fish camps. One of those doesn’t fit the bill and for a good reason. The place is Home Run Fishing Charters and Lodge, where world-class fishing is served with world-class service, first class lodging, Cajun hospitality and gourmet dining.

If going offshore is thinking too far and wide for your fishing tastes, then taking an inshore adventure with the expert captains is the next best thing.

The fishing is laid back while exciting. The scenery is spectacular and like none other in the world. The Louisiana marshes are a haven for wildlife, from shore birds and avian species to reptiles and every kind of fish imaginable.

Speckled trout, or spotted seatrout, are plentiful here. From April through November the fishing is prime. Best of all, you can catch speckled trout using a variety of lures and tactics. Topwater lures, Carolina-rigged soft plastics, lead head jigs and popping cork rigs all produce strikes.

On a Home Run Charters speckled trout trip, you can expect to get lots of strikes, and even multiple hookups for all aboard.

Want to know more about Home Run Charters? Check out the website at homeruncharters.com. Find out more about the inshore fishing, including rates, by clicking here. To get updated fishing reports, conditions and just chat with someone at Home Run Charters, call (504) 982-8862.

 

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

 

Reds on the Fly

 

Reds on the Fly

By Craig Lamb

In Venice, Louisiana, a bucket list trip awaits any fly fisherman up for the challenge of a lifetime. Even better, you get to cast amid the backdrop of some of the most scenic fishing waters in the country. 

The challenge is catching a redfish, or red drum, on fly tackle. The trip is to south Louisiana, where the Mississippi River infuses coastal marshes with nutrients that supercharge the food chain. Think a food chain, from tiny crustaceans to top level predators, that live on steroids. The fish grow big, fight hard and are plentiful.

Your destination is the southernmost town on the Mississippi River Delta. Appropriately, the outpost is a base camp for world-class saltwater fishing, from inshore to offshore.

Home Run Fishing Charters and Lodge is the premier outfitter in Venice and for a lot of reasons. Luxury accommodations, gourmet dining, Cajun hospitality and experienced, licensed captains using the latest and best boats and equipment are why.

Captain Brian Sherman has been called the “Pied Piper of Redfish” and for many reasons. The irony of this Michigan native moving here following Hurricane Katrina speaks to the bucket list clients he now takes fly fishing for redfish. 

“A lot of my clients are from the Northeast, Upper Midwest, and they come here during winter to get away from the cold, use their fly fishing tackle.” 

“They don’t get the chance to fish during our best months,” he continued. “Instead of storing tackle for winter they can come down here, in the warmer weather, and catch a fish of a lifetime.”

The NCAA’s equivalent of March Madness is called Marsh Madness in these parts. That time is from October and into January when the Mississippi River is lower than any other time of the year. As a result, the water is clearer and conditions more predictable. Fly fishing is ideal and even better, you can sight cast for the prize.

“You can see the fish tailing, feeding and those months, by far, are the best time to come here,” said Sherman. “You can put the fly two, three feet ahead of the fish.”

The resulting adrenaline rush of a 27-plus inch redfish peeling off line as you grip a doubled-over rod can’t be beaten. Expect to do that more than once, if the conditions are right.

“It’s kind of a ‘mano o mano,’ hand to hand combat kind of experience,” said Sherman. “Most guys who come here don’t expect the kind of fight those reds put up in the shallow marsh.”

Sherman has a lot of clients who are skilled, seasonal fly fishermen accustomed to landing trout in swift streams and rivers. He advises gearing up for a trip to south Louisiana.

Suggested gear is an 8- or 9-weight fly rod and reel spooled with 15- 30-pound tippet. In order of productivity, he recommends bringing Clouser Minnows, followed by blue crab and shrimp imitators. Choose flies with chartreuse as a base color.

What sets Home Run Charters apart is the Home Run Lodges. The lodges are located within the very same marina where you will meet your captain and board their boat. You can have a tasty breakfast and be out the door and into the boat within minutes.

You can dine, rest and sleep and luxury at the lodge. Rates begin at $159 per person. Accommodations are three separate lodges with kitchen, living room, dining room, and bedrooms. Also included in the package is breakfast, a boxed lunch, and dinner. Or, you can stay in the lodge for $99 per person without meals.

Ready to book a trip? Click here for more information on rates. Got questions? Click here for the FAQs. Need more information? Call (504) 909-TUNA.

 

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

 

 

Mollie Brings 2017 Gulf Coast Triple Crown Championship to Florida

  Mollie Brings 2017 Gulf Coast Triple Crown Championship to Florida   The Wharf, Orange Beach, Alabama: For the first time in its seven-year history, a charter boat has won the prestigious Gulf Coast Triple Crown Championship. Mollie, a 66 G&S operated by Capt. Jeff Shoults of Destin, Florida, captured the title after competing in the Blue Marlin Grand Championship that just concluded. Eric Hayles and Chance Young are the two mates working the cockpit of the custom sportfisher. Unlike previous years where private yachts earned top billing, Mollie had different sets of anglers for each event. “It is a little more difficult dealing with different teams each tournament,” Shoults said at the awards presentation. “But my crew makes it easy by explaining what’s going on and keeping everything together. We worked hard this season and I’m confident we’re going to win some more money in future tournaments. But at this point in our careers, it’s very gratifying to win this trophy and to be recognized among our peers.” The Gulf Coast Triple Crown Championship consists of five events in the central Gulf of Mexico and is sponsored by American Marine Brokerage. The affiliated tournaments include the Orange Beach Billfish Classic, Cajun Canyons Billfish Classic, Mississippi Gulf Coast Billfish Classic, Emerald Coast Blue Marlin Classic and the Blue Marlin Grand Championship. The Triple Crown is scored on a hybrid system that includes both weight and release points for the top three finishes in the blue marlin divisions only. Bonus points are also accrued for series participation, weighed marlin lengths and tournament marlin records.  The winning team receives The Championship Trophy, a seven-foot tall, one of a kind masterpiece handcrafted by metal artist Frank Ledbetter that is valued at $18,000. In addition, the Triple Crown Champion earns bragging rights amongst the region’s top big-game contestants.

Photo by: LightwavePhotographs.com

In winning the exquisite marlin sculpture and honors this season, Mollie placed second in the Mississippi Gulf Coast Billfish Classic with a blue weighing 654.2 pounds and was also named the top release boat with four more blue marlin credited. The team also earned bonus points for fishing the circuit and length allowances, for a total of 410 points. Lyon’s Pride, a 62 Viking owned by Bob Lyons, with Capt. Daniel Menard and mates Robert Eliason and Kendall Sauls finished second in the standings with 350 points. Team Supreme was third with 285 points. The 76 Viking is owned by Allen Krake, with Capt. Chase Lake and mate Rodney Johnson as the crew. The Triple Crown Championship has now made its way across the Gulf. Patron took it home to Texas in 2011 and Done Deal captured it twice in 2012 and 2013 to represent Louisiana. Sea Mixer put Alabama on the map in 2014, while Relentless Pursuit gave Louisiana another showcase in 2015. Breathe Easy (Alabama) was last year’s winner.

Photo by: Chris Miller

“The Triple Crown Championship trophy will be right at home in Destin with its long sport-fishing heritage,” says GCTC Director Scott Burt. “Congratulations to Capt. Jeff, Eric, Chance and all of Mollie’s anglers for an outstanding year. This boat is always a contender in the Gulf tournaments, and now they have the hardware to match that skill and dedication.”  

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Sea Chaser 24 HFC sets Standard for Serious Fish, Play Boat

 

 
Sea Chaser 24 HFC sets Standard for Serious Fish, Play Boat

By Craig Lamb

Are you a hardcore saltwater tournament angler? Will your family spend just as much time aboard the boat as you do fishing?

Finding a center console saltwater boat rigged and ready for fish and play isn’t that hard to find. What is though is finding a boat designed for comfort, safety and all the features you need for winning a tournament and keeping smiles on faces of family.

 

The boat that fills all those needs, and in luxury, comfort, and style, is the Sea Chaser 24 HFC by Carolina Skiff. Hybrid Fish & Cruise (HFC) truly means what it stands for in a boat. The revolutionary design of the HFC 24 is built from the bottom up with devoted fishermen and active families in mind.

Whatever the activity the 24 HFC is already rigged out with the features everyone needs to enjoy a long day on the water. Head out early for a long offshore run to catch pelagic species and then cruise a secluded island for an afternoon of beachcombing. You can do it all on the same trip with this features-loaded rig.

The 24 HFC delivers safety, comfort, style, and performance like no other boat in the class. The 24 HFC has a wide 101-inch beam, length overall of 23 feet, 9 inches, and a respectable gunwale height. You get that for safety, along with a fuel tank holding up to 100 gallons for long offshore runs and overnight trips to faraway destinations. The 24 HFC is rated for a maximum of 300 horsepower, providing plenty of transom space for dual outboards.

Comfort. That word sums up the interior family-friendly features of the 24 HFC. Up front is plush U-shaped bow lounge seating with forward facing backrest. Another bench seat can be folded down flush to the console for more cockpit roaming space.

Need storage space? There is more than you can ever need for watersports and other gear. Below the bow seating is a 208-quart/52-gallon compartment. Never loose sight of your cold beverage on this boat. There are eight stainless steel LED-illuminated cup holders throughout the boat. Additional bench seating is available, and a bi-fold console door leads to a marine head with standard Porta-Potti.

Tournament pros or weekend warriors will appreciate the blue-water setup for offshore fishing. Rocket launcher-style rod holders aft of the optional T-top and gunwale storage for six rods provide plenty of space to keep outfits at the ready. Eight top-gunwale mounted holders are positioned for trolling and drifting. Twin aerated live wells, a 25-gallon live well and 25-gallon baitwell built into the leaner seat, provide plenty of capacity for a long day of fishing.

Flip the cushioned helm seat and find the built-in live well, a prep sink with fold-down faucet and cutting board lid. Up front is a triangular-shaped deck hatch that can be used as a 32-gallong fish box. There’s even a molded recess to secure a bait bucket. Land your catch and store it in the in-floor fish box with bucket storage. Capacity is 128 quarts/32 gallons.

 

The 24 HFC has a large, open cockpit for setting tolling lines, a drift, or plenty of room when you double up with a partner on a trophy catch. There is a 15-gallon storage box extending across the transom bulkhead. Stern bench seating runs from beam to beam. Remove the plush cushions, and you have a built-in casting deck. Below the bench seating is a starboard hatch that opens to the insulated box for storing drinks or fish. The center hatch provides access to batteries and other operating systems of the boat.

For easy access, there’s a built-in side entry door and telescoping swim ladder. How’s that for upping your game for scuba diving, landing fish, or just boarding the boat with safety and ease.

The 24 HFC is built on Carolina Skiff’s legendary and trustworthy 30 years of boat design. Built with 100 percent composite construction, the 24 HFC is build solid and dependable for years of rugged use in saltwater environments. A quick-lift, high-performance step-hull provides quick hole shots to get the boat on plane for a smooth, dry ride.

You have a lot of options about finding out more about the HFC 24, Sea Chaser and Carolina Skiff models. There are 60 in all from which to choose and you can get started at carolinaskiff.com. You can find a dealer, learn more about the brand legacy, and build a boat on the website.  Join the community of Carolina Skiff followers at the Carolina Skiff Facebook Page.

 

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

 

Go shallower, further with Carolina Skiff DLX Tunnel Series

 
Go shallower, further with Carolina Skiff DLX Tunnel Series

By Craig Lamb

A pillar of the Carolina Skiff brand is the DLX Series, tracing its roots back to the first model built in 1983. Since then the DLX has built a loyal following as one of the most durable, versatile and stable boats on the water. Plain and simple, you just can’t beat it as a runabout, commercial workboat or for just about any activity on the water.

Could the DLX get even more versatile? Yep, and the proof is in the DLX Tunnel Series. The DLX is known for shallow draft, and that gets even more of a lift with the Tunnel Series.

What gives tunnel hulls an advantage is the higher outboard motor mount. Water is dispersed from the hull into the tunnel. Undisturbed water is then funneled to the prop for better bite and less cavitation. Throttle the outboard and the boat quickly gets on plan and stays there without porpoising. What else happens with a tunnel is better performance and even fuel economy. Less hull in the water means less drag, which also means less fuel consumed.

What else is different about the Tunnel Series than the standard DLX is fuel storage. The boat has a 30-gallon belly tank instead of a traditional fuel cell mounted in the stern or beneath the console. That gives the boat a lower center of gravity and more storage throughout.

The DLX Tunnel Series has a length overall of 19’ and a beam of just 93.” Weight is just 1,590 pounds and the draft is only 4.” Maximum power is 115 horsepower.

All of the above adds up to an impressive boat for ultra-shallow water fishing. Speckled trout, spotted seatrout. No matter what you call them, there is one technique that is synonymous with the catching species. A popping cork rig and live shrimp. There are times when that staple of trout fishing is unproductive. 

A sporting, fun alternative is catching this eagerly biting saltwater fishing mainstay with a fly rod. Trout are plentiful and eager to strike flies, making the fish and tactic a great entry point for fly fishing in saltwater.

A 5- to 7-weight rod, the size you might use for freshwater trout, will work for the saltwater species. If you are casting heavier flies, an 8-weight can handle the job. Carry separate fly outfits rigged with floating and intermediate sinking lines to cover enough of the water column.

Small trout prefer shrimp but will feed on minnows as they grow. Rig up with flies mimicking both foods with hook sizes ranging from No. 6 or No. 4, or 2/0 and 3/0 for mullet imitators. A Clouser Minnow is the all-inclusive standby. A 10-pound fluorocarbon tipped at the end of a 7-foot leader will get you read for action.

Fish over grass flats and pay special attention to light, sandy bottoms or darker areas that indicate deep drops.

Armed with a basic assortment of flies and a lightweight outfit you can pursue a plentiful, easily caught saltwater gamefish on a fly outfit. Of course, you’ll need the right boat to get into the shallow water. There is no better choice than the Carolina Skiff DLX Tunnel Series.

 

 

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

 

Fishing the Chesapeake

 

Fishing the Chesapeake

by Craig Lamb

 

Meet Captain Shannon Pickens, a lifelong resident of Maryland’s Eastern Shore and Yamaha professional angler.

“I grew up fishing here since I was a little kid and love it, just love it,” he said.

 

Pickens should indeed. Today he makes a living operating Working Girl Charters (FishTheChesapeakeBay.com). The waters are rich in tradition for guides and commercial captains like Pickens.

“We have everything here from shallow water fishing to out in the Bay and into the ocean,” he explained.

That covers all of the saltwater game fish species sought by anglers, from flounder to tuna, striped bass to marlin.

Homeport for Pickens is Tilghman Island, Md. He often fishes from the Papa John, a 27’ Contender center console powered by twin Yamaha 4.2L V6 Offshore Outboards.

“We have a number of big charter boats around here but not many center console, light tackle boats,” continued Pickens.

“It’s a 2005 Contender®, and those Yamahas have over 4,500 hours* and going,” he said.

“One day I might be fishing in 1 or 2 feet of water in the Bay and can run 70 miles the next day and chase tuna or marlin.”

Yamaha powers those competitive advantages, he believes.

“The efficiency and quietness of the outboards allows me to get into some of the shallowest water around, the rock piles and other highly productive areas inaccessible by the bigger boats.”

Pickens’ choice is Yamaha’s next generation of V6 4.2L Offshore outboards. Class leading big-bore design means the outboards have the best time-to-plane. Also leading the class is an outboard that is the lightest weight in its class with the largest displacement. Yamaha’s V6 4.2L offshore models feature up to 17% better long range fuel economy.

“What means the most to me is the reliability of my Yamahas,” he added. “I know my Yamahas will perform to the standards that I expect and that my clients expect when they get on board.”

Confidence is another factor in why Pickens relies on Yamaha.

“I know if you’ve got confidence in your equipment that lets you focus on the rest of what you’ve got going on around you,” he said.

Visit Yamaha Outboards.com Today!

 

 

*Results are based on commercial use, and may vary for traditional retail consumer use.  This document contains many of Yamaha’s valuable trademarks. It may also contain trademarks belonging to other companies. Any references to other companies or their products are for identification purposes only, and are not intended to be an endorsement.

 

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

 

Summer Dolphin Tactics

 

Summer Dolphin Tactics

By Capt. Gus Cane

 

Dolphin, Dorado, mahimahi. No matter what you call them these neon green, yellow and blue speedsters are perhaps the perfect pelagic game fish. Why? Because they fight extremely hard, they are common in warm waters around the world, they grow super fast, and they taste delicious. That’s why Dolphin are such a popular summertime target.

 

To get in on the fun, start with the computer. Satellite forecasting services can help pinpoint likely zones based on water temperatures, underwater structure, currents and temporary features like color changes and weed lines. Reports from the local tackle shop, marina or fishing forum will help narrow the search too.

 

On the water, the boat’s electronics will be invaluable tools. The chart plotter will identify ledges, humps and depth contours that concentrate bait. Some units offer real-time data overlays. Dial in the radar to paint frigates and other birds hunting for bait and keep a pair of binoculars handy to confirm the blips. The sounder will show the differences in water temperatures. Dolphin love hot water, so even a degree or two of change could mean a concentration of fish.

Having a mixed tackle set-up will expand your dolphin opportunities. Big plastic chugger and jet head lures on trolling combos run several waves behind the boat will cover plenty of water. A heavy Nylure lead jig in bright yellow trolled way back is a surefire bet. It often produces when nothing else will. A heavy spinning outfit with a large surface lure like a Sebile Popper can be cast quickly whenever the birds are working bait, or you run across a nice weed line or floating debris. Dolphin love to hang around anything, from wooden pallets, oil drums, trees and other flotsam. These “surface structures” attract small baitfish, which in turn attracts hungry dolphin. Another spinning outfit with a stout live bait hook and a chunk of ballyhoo is great enticement when that gang of gaffers does show up.

Dolphin typically travels in packs so once one is hooked, keep it in the water as long as possible. The thrashing and commotion will pull its school mates into casting range. If, after catching a couple the fish seem to lose interest, throw a handful of small cut ballyhoo pieces overboard. That will usually fire ‘em up again. Another trick is to use the raw water washdown hose and spray a light shower near the boat. The noise and dimpling water often triggers another feeding frenzy.

After a fun fight comes the best part—eating the catch. Dolphin filets are very mild and can be cooked a variety of ways. It’s hard to beat a big slab hot off the grill, however.

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Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com