Gyllenhaal Gives Great Performance in Sci-fi Horror Flick

 

Life,  Blu-Ray Review, Kam Williams, outer space adventure, alien force, international space station, claustrophobic thriller, Jake Gyllenhaal, Ryan ReynoldsLife

Blu-Ray Review by Kam Williams

Gyllenhaal Gives Great Performance in Sci-fi Horror Flick

In recent years, Hollywood has started serving up some outer space adventures, a la The Martian (2015) and The Space between Us (2017), suggesting that the Red Planet is basically a benign environment free of any hostile creatures. But just when we thought it was safe to visit Mars again, along comes Life, a cautionary horror flick unleashing a terrifying alien force aboard an international space station.

Directed by Daniel Espinosa (Safe House), the claustrophobic thriller co-stars Jake Gyllenhaal and Ryan Reynolds as Dr. David Jordan and Roy Adams, respectively, the Pilgrim 7’s  flight engineer and chief medical officer. The balance of the six-person crew is composed of Center for Disease Control quarantine specialist Dr. Miranda North (Rebecca Ferguson), systems engineer Sho Kendo (Hiroyuki Sanada), eco-biologist Dr. Hugh Derry (Ariyon Bakare) and the spaceship’s captain, Katerina Golovkin (Olga Dihovichnaya).

As the film unfolds, we learn that their appointed mission is merely to deliver a single-cell organism arriving via space probe from the surface of Mars. It all sounds easy enough as the disarming plotline initially devotes itself to developing the characters’ back stories, like how David is a disenchanted, Iraq War vet.   

Upon retrieving the capsule, they celebrate the discovery of the first incontrovertible proof of life beyond Earth. They even allow Sho’s daughter to give the ostensibly-innocuous substance a cute, cuddly name, oblivious of the danger lurking just over the horizon.

The plot thickens when “Calvin” begins reproducing via mitosis, and every cell of its luminescent ectoplasmic mass proves to be an irrepressible mix of brains and muscles. By day 25, the sentient creature develops proto-appendages and becomes strong enough to breach containment.

Initially, it nibbles on a finger of Hugh’s, who somehow discerns that “Calvin doesn’t hate us, but he’s got to kill us to survive.” Great. What ensues is a desperate race against time to return to Earth before the mushrooming monster devours them all, one-by-one.

Though reminiscent of such sci-fi classics as Alien (1979) and Species (1995), Life is a worthwhile addition to the extraterrestrial on the loose genre. Substantial credit in this regard goes to the ever-underappreciated Jake Gyllenhaal who turns in the latest in a long line of impressive performances which includes outings in Nocturnal Animals (2016), Southpaw (2015), Nightcrawler (2014) and Prisoners (2013), to name a few.

Strap yourself in for a cardiovascular screamfest that’ll keep you squirming from beginning to end.  A riveting reminder that it still ain’t smart to mess with Mother Nature!

Excellent (4 stars)

Rated R for violence, terror and pervasive profanity

In English, Japanese and Chinese with subtitles

Running time: 104 minutes

Distributor: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

Blu-ray Extras: Deleted scenes; Astronaut Diaries; Claustrophobic Terror: Creating a Thriller in Space; Life: In Zero G; and Creating Life: The Art and Reality of Calvin.

                                                                 

To order a copy of Life on Blu-ray, visit  https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B06XT9C1C9/ref%3dnosim/thslfofire-20

 

Source:  Baret News

 

Author Expounds on Labor of Love

 

Peter Brav

The “331 Innings” Interview

with Kam Williams

Author Expounds on Labor of Love

Peter Brav is not much of a baseball player but he’s written three novels where the diamond provides a setting for triumph over adversity in one way or another. Sneaking In (set during the 1999 Yankees championship season), The Other Side Of Losing (set during a Chicago Cubs championship season) and now 331 Innings (set in a small Nebraska town). Add in Zappy I’m Not, a memoir of a cranky middle-aged man reincarnated as a small dog, and you have a literary celebration of all manner of admirable underdogs.

Peter Brav, 331 Innings, Interview, bullying, war, life, Lincoln, Nebraska, Princeton, NJPeter has written several plays including South Beach, African Violet, Later, The Rub, Good Till Cancelled, and Trump Burger which have all been performed in staged readings. A a graduate of Cornell University and Harvard Law School, he resides in Princeton, New Jersey with wife Janet and three Papillons.

Kam Williams: Hi Peter, thanks for the interview.

Peter Brav: Totally my pleasure, Kam.

KW: What inspired you to write 331 Innings?

PB:Well, first of all, it’s not a baseball book. That plays a very small part of it. It covers ground I’ve become comfortable with. Trying to understand why we’re all here for such a relatively short time and yet make it harder on each other and ourselves than it should be. I was thinking about bullying and war, specifically, and how they’re linked. And what a better world we’d have, if we could minimize both of them.

KW: How would you describe the novel in 25 words or less?

PB: It’s a pretty powerful 16th year in the life of John Schram, an undersized, underappreciated underdog. Anger’s getting the best of him and he’s most certainly heading in the wrong direction. Hopefully, he’s going to turn things around before it’s too late.

KW: Was the book’s narrator, Jack Schram, based on a real-life person?

PB: John’s Uncle Jack is a fictional 84 year-old lifelong Nebraskan. But Jack’s an amalgam of many older people I’ve met, whether they be relatives or folks at my father’s assisted living center. Like Jack, they’ve made livings, raised families, fought in wars, and watched loved ones and friends pass on. And if they’re like Jack, they marvel at how the younger generations around them keep making the same mistakes they did. I’ve always felt comfortable with older people, perhaps an old soul and all that. It remains to be seen whether that continues now that I’m getting there more rapidly than I’d like.

KW: How much research did you have to do in order to set the story in Nebraska?

PB: I drove through Nebraska four years ago and spent a wonderful week in Lincoln. I know there are significant differences from the Northeast and they’re highlighted on a daily basis on CNN with red and blue colors. But for my time there, on a closeup and personal level, I encountered nothing but personal warmth. And beautiful landscapes. The story wrote itself when I got back.

KW: What message do you want readers to take away from the novel?

PB: Well, some of what I just alluded to. We’ve got no shortage of underdogs in this world, battling whatever adversity comes their way to try and make a good life for themselves and others. What we could use a little more of is leaders, let’s call them overdogs, with a conscience. And that’s pretty much what happens near the end of the novel. Something brings the high school in-crowd and outcasts together, for one really long game anyway, and the rest of the world comes along for the ride. In my 2009 Chicago Cubs fantasy, The Other Side of Losing, I had a very protracted week-long rain delay during the World Series where people come together. This is a bit of the same thing, taking a break from “winning” to maybe show a little love.

KW: Are you already working on your next opus?

PB: Well, as you know, this lawyering thing keeps getting in the way, especially in the spring and summer. But I’ve finished a play called Propriety I’m hopeful about and I’ve started a new play set in the pre-war tumult of the late Thirties.

KW: AALBC.com founder Troy Johnson asks: What was the last book you read?

PB: Great question, Troy. I wish I had more time to read but I’m getting better. I’ll mention two. The Berlin Boxing Club, a great young adult novel by Robert Sharenow.

https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/006157970X/ref=nosim/thslfofire-20

And I’m just finishing War Against War, a terrific nonfiction book about the years before World War I by Michael Kazin.

https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1476705909/ref=nosim/thslfofire-20 

KW: Ling-Ju Yen asks: What is your earliest childhood memory?

PB: Thanks, Ling-Ju. My beloved mother Adele, a survivor of the Holocaust who passed away two years ago, schlepping my sister and me on subways to see a matinee of Carousel in Manhattan. I believe I was 4 years-old.

KW: What is your favorite dish to cook?

PB: Cooking’s never been one of my strong suits, Kam. But my kids would say my scrambled eggs are perfectly edible.

KW: Craig Robinson asks: What was your last dream?

PB: Hi, Craig. My night dreams are gone shortly after I wake up. There are nights I’m pretty dream-prolific, too. But my daydreams hang around forever; they’re in 331 Innings.

KW: Sherry Gillam would like to know what is the most important life lesson you’ve learned so far? 

PB: That’s such a good question, Sherry, and I want you to know I learned it very early on. It’s to evaluate everyone I meet on the basis of individual character only. No wealth, race, religion, nationality, age, popularity considerations, or anything else. And I’ve been the beneficiary of that lesson, with a diverse group of friends enriching my life on a daily basis.

KW: When you look in the mirror, what do you see?

PB: I don’t know, give me a minute, and I’ll get back to you with a quite pained response. I see someone super blessed to have had the love and encouragement of my incredible wife Janet and the rest of my

family and friends.

  

KW: What’s the craziest thing you’ve ever done?

PB: I’m going to assume you mean intentionally. Most of the “crazy” things I did only look that way with hindsight. But I’d say naively taking my MGB without snow tires into the mountains of Vermont in the winter of 1981 ranks right up there.

KW: If you could have one wish instantly granted, what would that be for?

PB: For the powers that be throughout the world to have a collective Moment of Zen, to borrow from Jon Stewart, in which they realize they have more power and wealth than could be consumed in multiple lifetimes. And then actually do something about it to reduce war, oppression, inequity, ignorance, and the planet’s deterioration. It shouldn’t take the arrival of a worse species as happened in Tim Burton’s Mars Attacks! to bring people together.

KW: The Tavis Smiley question: How do you want to be remembered?

PB: That’s tough since most of us will be remembered by very few. But I hope it’s for more than those scrambled eggs.

KW: Finally, what’s in your wallet?

PB: The usual I’m sure. Five dollars and a completely illegible idea for a new novel scrawled on a napkin.

KW: Thanks again for the time, Peter, and best of luck with the book.

PB: Thank you, Kam, I hope folks enjoy it. Writing it was a joy for me.

To order a copy of 331 Innings, visit: https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1544237944/ref%3dnosim/thslfofire-20 

Read more of Peter’s work at www.peterbrav.com

and follow him at: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/3299307.Peter_Brav

and: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorPeterBrav/

and: https://twitter.com/PGBistroPG

 

Source:  Baret News 

Microscopic Martian Matter Morphs into Monster in Outer Space Screamfest

 

Life

Film Review by Kam Williams

Microscopic Martian Matter Morphs into Monster in Outer Space Screamfest

In recent years, Hollywood has started serving up some outer space adventures, a la The Martian (2015) and The Space between Us (2017), suggesting that the Red Planet is basically a benign environment free of any hostile creatures. But just when we thought it was safe to visit Mars again, along comes Life, a cautionary horror flick unleashing a terrifying alien force aboard an international space station.

Life,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Daniel Espinosa, proof of life beyond Earth, cardiovascular screamfest

Rory Adams (Ryan Reynolds) in Columbia Pictures’ LIFE.

Directed by Daniel Espinosa (Safe House), the claustrophobic thriller co-stars Jake Gyllenhaal and Ryan Reynolds as Dr. David Jordan and Roy Adams, respectively, the Pilgrim 7’s  flight engineer and chief medical officer. The balance of the six-person crew is composed of Center for Disease Control quarantine specialist Dr. Miranda North (Rebecca Ferguson), systems engineer Sho Kendo (Hiroyuki Sanada), eco-biologist Dr. Hugh Derry (Ariyon Bakare) and the spaceship’s captain, Katerina Golovkin (Olga Dihovichnaya).

As the film unfolds, we learn that their appointed mission is merely to deliver a single-cell organism arriving via space probe from the surface of Mars. It all sounds easy enough as the disarming plotline initially devotes itself to developing the characters’ back stories, like how David is a disenchanted, Iraq War vet.   

Upon retrieving the capsule, they celebrate the discovery of the first incontrovertible proof of life beyond Earth. They even allow Sho’s daughter to give the ostensibly-innocuous substance a cute, cuddly name, oblivious of the danger lurking just over the horizon.

Life,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Daniel Espinosa, proof of life beyond Earth, cardiovascular screamfest

David Jordan (Jake Gyllenhaal) and Miranda North (Rebecca Ferguson) in Columbia Pictures’ LIFE.

The plot thickens when “Calvin” begins reproducing via mitosis, and every cell of its luminescent ectoplasmic mass proves to be an irrepressible mix of  mix brains and muscles. By day 25, the sentient creature develops proto-appendages and becomes strong enough to breach containment.

Initially, it nibbles on a finger of Hugh’s, who somehow discerns that “Calvin doesn’t hate us, but he’s got to kill us to survive.” Great. What ensues is a desperate race against time to return to Earth before the mushrooming monster devours them all, one-by-one.

Though reminiscent of such sci-fi classics as Alien (1979) and Species (1995), Life is a worthwhile addition to the extraterrestrial on the loose genre. Substantial credit in this regard goes to the ever-underappreciated Jake Gyllenhaal.who turns in the latest in a long line of impressive performances which includes outings in Nocturnal Animals (2016), Southpaw (2015), Nightcrawler (2014) and Prisoners (2013), to name a few.

Strap yourself in for a cardiovascular screamfest that’ll keep you squirming in your seat.  A riveting reminder that it still ain’t smart to mess with Mother Nature!

Excellent (4 stars)

Rated R for violence, terror and pervasive profanity

In English, Japanese and Chinese with subtitles

Running time: 103 minutes

Distributor: Columbia Pictures

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

Source:  GIG News                   

Heroes Never Wore a Mask

 

Heroes Never Wore a Mask

 

Although there are a few Marvel characters that donned the mask in order to hide their true identities, from their girlfriends, usually – the real heroes of this world go without one. You see, heroes are fighting for something. Whether you believe in their fight or not, they face the battle head-on, with their identities out there for the world to see.

 

eye-626870_640It is impossible to ever say that this world will not see another war. Everyone seems to want to fight for something, even though most of the ‘causes’ have grown meek. Greed, the wish for power, the belief that they are gods, the fight to be the industry’s best by going back to the times of robber barons…these are ‘causes’ that mean nothing and are only single pursuits that, by the way, fail.

 

Generation after generation has faced their enemies. We all know this. The uniforms changed, bringing forth a new rival that the opposite “side” could discern as the enemy. Take it back to the beginning of time, or before, when medieval men fought or when men in tunics followed Caesar. Yes, back then there were men who believed they were gods, as well – living on top of an acropolis surrounded by gold statues that depicted names, such as, Athena or Zeus. Oddly enough, however, they still did not cover their faces. Knights on horseback did, although they used the masks as armor, and always made sure that their enemy knew who they were battling.

 

Who knew generations would grow so angry that mere children would walk into grade schools with guns and shoot their friends? Some even then commit suicide. Children. In the recent past, grandparents who worried about their grandchildren being able to succeed in life, now fear if they will live long enough to succeed.

 

Politics certainly brings about battles. Debates, whether idiotic or intelligent, are held all the time. They debate to tell you what you either want to hear in order for them to take a chair of power, or tell you what they truly believe whether you like it or not, because they wish to change the world – for right or for wrong. Yet they wear no masks. Only silly smiles that humans can see through, if they would just look hard enough.

 

No one should have a gun set in their hands that has no understanding of what it does or the pain it can cause. “Rights” are fought for, without the end result being taken into account. And now, whether you wish to take 9/11, or the Paris tragedy from this past week, or a myriad of other horrors – masks were worn.

 

In someone’s mind they may be “following” others that fight for something important. Perhaps they are the “leaders” of those others telling them the fight is worth their lives and the lives of innocent others. And do not even claim these people who die are not innocent. When someone is going to work, or sitting at a concert, or having a meal with their children – they are innocent. When someone comes along and starts shooting, those victims remain innocent. They are not in positions of power that harm anyone else. They are people, families, children who really do wish to live to see themselves succeed.

 

This is not a political statement; it’s a belief, a question, a confusion, a need to understand why the world is doing what it’s Globe_hands2doing. Nothing changes with these actions. Only body counts rise. So, why? What are you proving?

 

A true hero will never wear a mask. A cover does not show strength, power, and it certainly shows no courage whatsoever. It shows only that you are a coward.

 

Sincerely,

A Grandparent

 

 

Source:  Baret News

Making the “Castle” Complete

Making the “Castle” Complete

by Amy Lignor

 

There are so many different lifestyle choices nowadays, it’s hard to pick just the right one that will add to the peace and serenity of your own life. But when it comes to the house, the “castle” you own is your castle, whether it be Buckingham Palace or the cabin in the woods with the lovely scene of wildlife all around. In 2015, however, one of the things that make
the castle the best it can be comes from the outside, not the inside. Gardening and landscaping have jumped to the top of 6277419029_2d4c580eecthe list when it comes to talking about home redecoration or renovation. Not only because it helps to sell the house in the future, adding more ‘finery’ to grab more money from the potential buyer, but also because the owner wants a place where they can go to sit, relax, and love life.

 

Whether you have the kids in the backyard that want a huge, safe place to play while you watch them from the deck; or you have that stunning front yard that everyone can see when they pass by and look in awe at the beauty that you have chosen to decorate it with, the outside of that castle has become a huge part of daily life.

 

It is true that any real estate person will tell you that landscaping is the first thing a buyer sees, and it is the framing that shows your house off to its highest potential. If the frame of the picture isn’t right, then the picture within looks shoddy and poor, which is not something you want to see. Choosing the right landscaping is a tough job. After all, there are a million things you can do to the front or backyard, from putting in that pool you always wanted, to putting in the perfect garden for you to enjoy through all seasons…the yard is something that not only helps the house, but allows you to get outside and actually enjoy it.

 

One dynamic feature comes with a tree. Now, there is a belief out there that only Nature, herself, can create a tree. However, that’s not exactly true. You can put in trees. Maybe not the 100-year-old oak that has stood magnificently on a property, but you can add smaller that will bring about so many benefits, including the absolute beauty of being able to look at it on a daily basis. The benefit list is long when it comes to having trees on the property: from the storm water runoff, where trees, of course, draw up water run-off stopping pollutants to the energy savings they bring. Trees cool homes in summertime, as well as working as windbreakers during the winter.

 

When it comes to beauty, it is lovely to have a rose bush – the colors are startling, BUT, it is far better to have the native shrubs, plants and flowers to your area simply because they thrive at all times. Indigenous plants do not need the constant time and money that has to be put into foreign plants, because they are already in their natural habitat. And the help they give to the surrounding wildlife cannot be measured. Even The National Wildlife Federation supports this so much that they award a special certification to homeowners who create natural habitats that allow for birds, and other animals a place to feed, live, and enjoy life by keeping the natural world intact.

 

On ‘to-do’ lists when it comes to increasing the beauty of your castle are everything from rain gardens that filter and distribute runoff underground, and prevent storm water from flooding basements, as well as the beauty of fencing.

 

Putting up the right fence is part of the new lifestyle of the castle you want to live in. Fencing can come in all forms, from stone terracing to the beauty of natural wood. Fencing always adds safety to the home and, if placed in correctly, can not only help the backyard but also the front. Curb appeal can be increased if just the right type of fencing is added so the frame around the castle is elegant and/or charming.

 

And never bypass that outdoor lighting that can truly be stunning, casting brilliance on the castle that is all yours.

 

Photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/65978013@N03/6277419029

Source:  Baret News Wire

SPRING TOO

SPRING TOO

by Peter Brav

robin egg
 

Back at the table to negotiate

Warm blue sky running few weeks late

One groundhog dropped

Another one dead

Give me one reason to get out of this bed

Thin blood, thin patience

Crazy texting drivers on all that black ice

Weather and traffic every seven minutes

No news here but it is never nice

Robins voice enough is enough

Three ounce songbirds can handle rough

Yellow sprouts in fog of gray

Galoshes hung and children play

There’ll be no stopping it soon

April hurtling through May and into June

Impatiens planted, even weeds look pretty

Replacing oil blackened slush of a major city

Blues, greens, yellows, reds

Life springs again from beneath deathbeds

Every year the struggle grows

Every interminable frost seems our last

Then magnificent spring arrives

Its budding color glory

Consigning hopelessness to the past

 

Peter BravSource:  Baret News Wire

 

Laugh Until You Cry

Laugh Until You Cry

~ Amy Lignor

I was a kid. I had the best family imaginable, yet I felt out of place. The only thing I could really do well was make up jokes when others weren’t feeling all that good. Even today, as my Mom struggles with retirement and getting older, she’ll cry at times because she feels like a burden (which, by the way, she is not).
But even at those times, I can tell a joke, or change my voice in such a way that makes the tears go away and she laughs again, forgetting that feeling of sadness that she had just a moment before. I love that gift. I also love writing characters in books that are sarcastic, and can throw out a line that makes you laugh even at the most suspenseful moments. I like that because I truly believe, that ‘laughter is the best medicine’. I don’t like tears, unless they come when you have laughed so hard you can’t stop crying; those are great tears – the tears that happen when your abdomen hurts and you can’t catch your breath because of the laughter. I know tears are necessary for some – they make you feel better. But I never felt that way. Having a laugh actually does eject the bad – it’s almost like the bad can’t touch you as long as you’re smiling back at it.

Robin Williams poses for Mork & Mindy.

When I was a kid I suffered from depression. Although, back then, the doctor stated I was just trying to get out of going to school. But there was a face, a voice, a presence that made me pull out of that darkness, and that was Robin Williams. I was young. I had no idea he was addicted to anything, nor would I have cared. He made me become addicted to laughter – to caring about others and pulling them out of their sadness so they could enjoy the day. Growing up, whenever I got down on myself or felt the weight of the world on my shoulders, all I had to do was watch some old ‘Mork & Mindy’s’, or ‘Comic Relief’, or the stand-ups that I had purchased on DVD. I watched them over and over again – knowing the jokes by heart, but still laughing every single time.

 

I’m not going to preach or tell you I know anything about addiction. I believe that only the ones who have to deal with it every day can speak about it – no offense to these so-called T.V. experts and celebrity doctors who wish to constantly talk about something they’ve never battled. I can speak to the weight of Robin_Williams_2011a_(2)depression, and the feeling that even though everyone around you is laughing, and you did your job for the ones you care for, that there’s a darkness inside you that won’t go away.

 

Robin Williams helped me with that, and thanks to the world of media he will continue to. His caring and out of this world ability to make people laugh until

they cried is something no one else does – or will ever do. His shoes cannot be filled; and shouldn’t be. When you have been in the presence of the master, no one else could do his job justice.

 

I write this because I, like millions of others, will miss Robin Williams more than anything. We will miss the excitement that occurred when he took the stage, because you knew he was going to outshine everyone and the laughter he was about to provide you would be a precious thing to hold onto. He was the most caring soul, attempting to help one and all and making it his job to bring back the smile that had left our faces for a while.

 

It will not surprise me if the weather is rainy; it won’t surprise me if there’s flooding. Robin Williams is now standing in Heaven – hopefully smiling himself and not worried anymore. And it is a given that he will be telling joke after joke…until everyone ‘up there’ laughs so hard, they cry.

 

Rest in Peace, Sir. And thank you for the peace you gave me.

 

Until Next Time,

Amy

 

Source: Baret News Wire

Edward Witten: On The Big Bang, Music, and Beauty

Edward Witten: On The Big Bang, Music, and Beauty

 

375px-Edward_WittenEdward Witten is the Charles Simonyi Professor of Mathematical Physics at the Institute for Advanced Study. He is best known for his research on string theory and is, according to TIME Magazine, often considered the greatest theoretical physicist in the world. He has received numerous awards for his work including a MacArthur Fellowship, the Einstein Medal, and the Fields Medal.

 

 


Q. What impact do the recent findings about the Big Bang and Inflation have on your work?

A. At the moment, there are questions about whether the recent findings will really hold up, or whether what was reported was an effect of dust in our galaxy. However, if the findings do hold up, they are remarkable evidence of an effect of quantum gravity and they give much tangible motivation for the quest to understand quantum gravity, which is what string theorists are engaged in. Also, this relatively large effect gives some hope that eventually it will be possible to obtain more precise clues about the workings of quantum gravity from future observations.

 

If your work is proven true, what are the consequences for everyday life?

Learning about string theory is like learning about a distant galaxy.  It is interesting, and the new understanding enriches our lives.

 

What do you think the world’s willingness to spend a reported $10 billion on the Large Hadron Collider says about human nature?

I think people really care about the results obtained by scientists, partly of course because of the practical applications of scientific work, but not only. Many of our fellow citizens are truly interested in the things that scientists learn about the universe, whether it is discovering the Higgs [boson] particle at a high-energy collider, observing a distant galaxy, or trying to understand the fundamentals of quantum gravity.

 

What motivates you to do what you do?

The topics I work on are fascinating.  Modern ideas in physics and mathematics have a beauty that, to one who has experienced it, is just as real as the beauty of music.

 

 

Interview conducted by Nick Antoine. Published May 16, 2014.

About the Author

A business enthusiast and biography buff, Nick Antoine holds an A.B. in History from Princeton University and is currently a research associate for a financial firm in the Chicago area. He is the founder of graham + west, a blog that presents insights into American culture through highlights from interviews with leading authorities in business, art, science, sports, and politics. You can visit his site at http://www.grahamandwest.com/