Urban Comedy Explores Korean Domination of Black Haircare Industry

 

Brazilian Wavy,  Film Review, African-American, Chris Rock, Korean, Aron Ranen, Kirk Henriquest, wacky comedyBrazilian Wavy

Film Review by Kam Williams

Urban Comedy Explores Korean Domination of Black Haircare Industry

In recent years, a couple of groundbreaking documentaries addressed some serious issues pertaining to African-American hair. The first, Aron Ranen’s Black Hair, chronicled the Korean takeover of the black haircare industry. The second, Chris Rock’s Good Hair, was an eye-opening expose about the dangers and costs associated with sisters’ straightening hair and purchasing wigs in capitulation to a European definition of beauty.

Now we have Brazilian Wavy, a wacky comedy which takes a lighter look at the same two themes. Directed by Kirk Henriques the thought-provoking film packs a wealth of information before delivering an emotional punch, despite lasting a mere 21 minutes. Much like your typical TV sitcom, the entertaining short manages to entertain while sending you away with a worthwhile message to reflect upon.

The picture’s plot is straightforward enough. At the point of departure, we meet Remy (Barry Floyd), a nerdy brother who just had his heartbroken by his two-timing girlfriend, Jin (Celeste Seda). To add insult to injury, word gets around that she left him for an undocumented midget driving a garish, pumpkin-looking jalopy.

More importantly, she’s also Korean and the daughter of the owner of the only beauty supply store in this neck of the ‘hood. Brazilian Wavy, Film Review, African-American, hair industry, Korean, Aron Ranen, Kirk Henriquest, wacky comedyThat conveniently dovetails with the fact that Remy’s something of a scientist and has just invented a new styling gel called Brazilian Wavy which he’d like her father to carry.

But after being turned down, he hatches an elaborate plan to burglarize the store in the middle of the night  with the help of his brother Mavo (Lamont King) and roommate Zakia (Jasmine Burke). Of course, things don’t go as planned, and the ensuing developments are best left unspoiled.

Suffice to say that Brazilian Wavy is a fun way to learn that the chemicals black folks use in their hair can cause serious harm, like baldness and blindness. Nevertheless, many are willing to assume the risk and “Live by the perm, die by the perm, and go out in style.”

Very Good (3 stars)

Unrated

Running time: 21 minutes

Studio: Maroon Work

To see a trailer for Brazilian Wavy, visit: https://vimeo.com/174867558

 

Source:  Baret News

Tyler Perry Back as Sassy Granny for Coarse Comedy

 

Boo! A Madea Halloween , Blu-ray Review,  by Kam Williams, Chris Rock, Tyler Perry, sermonizing granny, Diamond WhiteBoo! A Madea Halloween

Blu-ray Review by Kam Williams

Tyler Perry Back as Sassy Granny for Coarse Comedy

No one has ever accused Tyler Perry of being short on ideas. After all, the prolific writer/director has been the brains behind a profusion of plays, movies and television shows.  But he would be the first to admit that he was not the source of inspiration for Boo! A Madea Halloween, the ninth in the Madea series revolving around the sassy, sermonizing granny.

Rather, the idea originated with Chris Rock, who featured a fake poster for a film with the identical title in his 2014 comedy Top Five. Because the joke went viral, Tyler decided why not get back in drag and make a movie to meet the demand generated by the buzz.

But Boo! definitely has a different feel from the previous Madea movies in that it is less your typical Tyler Perry morality play than a rudderless, kitchen sink comedy seizing on any excuse for a laugh. For, the Madea found here is no longer that Bible-thumping role model reliably interfering on behalf of an underdog in distress. Yes, one minute, she’s might be promoting old-fashioned values. However, there she is in the next scene exposing her breasts to lecherous frat boys.

The film does feature a rudimentary plot revolving around Madea’s 17 year-old grand-niece, Tiffany (Diamond White). Note that the premise is established at the point of departure and promptly abandoned. It’s Halloween, and the headstrong high schooler and her girlfriends hope to attend an “epic” party being thrown at Upsilon Theta frat house.

Since her divorced father (also played by Perry) will be otherwise occupied, it falls to Madea to babysit Tiffany, to make sure the rebellious teen never leaves the house. Made arrives with an entourage of amusing misfits, including marijuana-addicted Aunt Bam (Cassi Davis), marble-mouthed Hattie (Patrice Lovely), and old fool Uncle Joe (also played by Perry). 

Soon, silly Halloween-themed one-liners, non sequiturs, slapstick and sight gags start flowing at a fast and furious rate that will undoubtedly be appreciated by the target, African-American audience. Yet, many of the punchlines are just as likely to be lost on those unable to decipher the often-inscrutable ebonics-laden exchanges.

Brace yourself for the specter of self-righteous Madea serving up street justice to clowns, collegiates, ghosts and goblins!

Good (2 stars)

Rated PG-13 for drug use, suggestive content, profanity, ethnic slurs, scary images and mature themes

Running time: 103 minutes

Distributor: Lionsgate Home Entertainment

Blu-ray extras: “Boo! From the Crew montage; and Why We Love Madea! featurette. 

To order a copy of Boo! A Madea Halloween on Blu-ray, visit:

https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B01LTHWY1U/ref%3dnosim/thslfofire-20