Propane vs. Gas: The Camper’s Debate

 

Propane vs. Gas: The Camper’s Debate

 

Although they say every “opinion” is worth about two cents nowadays (and if you’re career happens to be in politics it’s worth even less) there are some definite facts that come along with choosing what is easier and better, between propane and gas, to use in the Great Outdoors.

 

backpacking, environment, summer, travel, propane, white gas, hunting, camping, fuel options, bio-fuels

Let us begin with the issue of ease. It is absolutely true that propane is one of the easiest fuel sources to use. After all, you screw in the container, turn on the valve, and simply light the gas that’s exiting the burners; how much more ease can you ask for? Seeing as that propane is already under pressure, you do not have to pump it or do anything special. When you’re talking about white gas (Coleman fuel), you have to pump the container up, heat up a bit of the fuel, and then ignite it. So it obviously takes more time in the set up and start up categories than when speaking about a propane stove.

 

Propane stoves for the camper also provide the benefit of ease when it comes to transportation. There is no need to worry about filling it up, spilling fuel by mistake, or priming the stove, which makes it more fun and less of a chore for the individual when it comes to enjoying their camping experience.

 

Although this is starting to sound like propane runs away with the race, it is important to note that even with all the benefits, propane does have some definite problems that you will encounter with gas stoves. Propane is not able to be used in very low temperatures. Say you’re looking at a forty degree hunting/camping/fishing weekend. Or maybe you are an ice fishing lover and will sit in 0 degree weather or less; if that is the case, propane is definitely off your list and white gas is the one and only choice.

 

If we’re talking about backpacking instead of driving that RV or camper up to your site, propane also is not the one you want to go with. Although it’s easy to transport, that benefit falls apart when talking about throwing it into your backpack for the long trek. Propane containers are heavy and they are not disposable. Seeing as that garbage cans can usually not be discovered on top of the mountain, you will also be forced to carry those containers back down with you. When it comes to gas containers, they are lighter and smaller, which makes the backpacker far happier.

 

In addition, when it comes to refilling the propane canister – the small ones, that is – you will be unable to. You will be forced, instead, to trash them in a landfill, whereas white gas stove containers can simply be refilled.

 

When you get down to the brass tacks of cooking, another issue also crops up when speaking about cooking with propane. Simply put, when propane burns, heat, light, carbon dioxide, and water are produced. When the water vapor comes in contact with your food it alters the taste ever so slightly. This is why many choose to use charcoal to cook instead of propane, because the briquettes offer a great flavor to the food.

 

Keep in mind that there are three types of stoves to choose from: Canister stoves, which are easy-to-use, low-maintenance stoves that typically screw onto the threaded tops of self-sealing fuel canisters that contain two pre-pressurized gases (isobutane and propane). Liquid fuel stoves, which are extremely versatile stoves that connect to refillable fuel bottles, not only white gas. And, last but not least, Alternative-fuel stoves that is a category that continues to grow bigger with each passing year. More and more backpacking and camping stoves are being made that run on fuel pellets or actual wood.

 

Make sure that the size, ease of transportation, and the ability to run the stove in certain temperature are all issues you take into account before choosing what is right for you. Whereas propane might be perfect for that family camping trip, your backpacking excursion most certainly will call for the smaller, easier to carry gas options.

 

But no matter what, keep those Great Outdoors safe and have one heck of a trip!

 

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle

S’mores in the SnowS’mores in the Snow

 

 by Troutski

Camping is one of those traditional summer events that everyone looks forward to. The whole nature-loving family awaits the time when the warm weather will return, so they can pack up the RV and head into the outdoors. However…making those s’mores in the snow will also create some very cool camping memories.

 

Yes…the RV looks a lot nicer this time of year; heat is a luxury most people want. But there are still those diehard outdoorsmen and women who want to put up that tent, use the sleeping bag and wake up to a frosty morning with a snow-capped mountain hovering wcover them.

 

The words, ‘winter wonderland’ can mean a great many things. For kids, it’s that pristine yard where the snowballs will soon be flying and the sleds will be racing down the hills. But for the inner camper, the world is their winter fun-zone and they intend to enjoy it.

 

Just think, once the snow flies those pesky bugs and mosquitoes have said ‘so long’, which adds even more serenity to the trip. There are no crowds of campers to deal with who have a tendency to annoy you in the summer as they grow louder and louder when nighttime approaches. It’s just you, your family and the deer – what more could you ask for?

 

But there are some very important tips the amateur winter camper needs to remember before venturing into that beautiful, but still dangerous, winter wonderland. There are some people who are born to live in specific temperatures; they understand sleighs without being descendants of Old Saint Nick. They understand hoe to forage for food, and make sure that death by hypothermia won’t occur.

 

But the challenges loom for thee rest of us as the panning begins. Making sure to always remember that severe weather can happen in an instant out there is a must. And with shorter daylight hours, you have less time to face a challenge head-on and win.

 

Study is key when it comes to your planning stage. Make sure you have the maps, head to Google, or know the area where you’ll be wc2staking claim in order to know the ways out, the food available, if certain packs or animal herds may be roaming around, etc., to be as safe as possible.

 

Make sure you bring the gear needed for traveling in the heavy snow – from the snowshoes to the sleds to the ATV transports. Is there search and rescue nearby? Or, have you brought the gear necessary to get someone to safety if need be? Yes…these are not exactly happy things to think about when planning a vacation, but you’ll be a whole lot happier knowing you’ve dotted all i’s and crossed all t’s to make sure your safety is not in danger.

 

This may sound like a silly tip, but check the forecast. In some areas storms can crop up out of nowhere, but at least that meteorologist has some sense of what may be coming at you while you’re out there living off the ice-covered world. The Boy Scouts mantra of ‘Be Prepared’ works well when it comes to winter camping. Let’s face it, the most unexpected things in life come straight from Mother Nature.

 

Clothing should be layered upon leaving that warm house for the Great Outdoors. Insulation that’s waterproof is a must, and by utilizing layers, you always have the ability to take off various pieces if the sun comes out to say ‘hello’.

 

Not to mention, boots are made for trekking out there in the snow, so make sure your feet are covered with the waterproof and well insulated brands made just for the winter wonderland.

 

You want comfort and safety while you explore. And when you get back to camp, make sure you have the right elements needed to build that fire of yours. Not only will you keep warm but those s’mores (which are the best part of camping) will not cook themselves!

 

 

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