Sebastian Women’s Group Aglow with Potential

“Through a commitment to prayer, Aglow women are building that spiritual house, a global house of prayer for all nations to see God’s blessing on the peoples of the earth and their destinies fulfilled.”
                                                                        Nancy McDaniel, Aglow International

Sebastian, FL – Aglow International embellished the Treasure Coast with a new sector known as the Sebastian Community Aglow.  These women bond their hearts together in prayer and then respond to God’s unique call as an apostolic body of influence for virtue in the world.

“We got off to a rough start because of the hurricanes, but we are back on track ready to share God’s love,” said Kathy Gehrke, Sebastian, Florida. 
 
The Sebastian Community Aglow has about 50 members and is continuing to grow. “This is a way in which women can bond with other women whom all believe in the gospel, said Gehrke.  “It is one of the largest international Christian women’s organizations in the world with over 1,400 groups called lighthouses in the U.S. and more than 2,100 groups outside the U.S.”

The interdenominational organization of Christian women is proud of the fact that they introduce others to Jesus Christ, through the sharing of teachings of the Bible. “I am proud to be a member of a unique group such as this one, Sebastian is a great place and the group is the icing on the cake,” said Verla Glen, Sebastian.

In 1967, four Christian women with a similar vision converged together without any restrictions or denominational boundaries. According to www.aglow.org, one of the first local fellowships began in Edmonds, a small town just north of Seattle, where women began to invite their friends and neighbors to regular meetings at a local restaurant. Quickly, word spread about a lively series of groups for women, and fellowships began springing up around Washington. Other states followed as well as other countries. By 1972, more than 60 local fellowships were holding monthly meetings around the U.S. By 1973, fellowships began in Canada and New Zealand. The Netherlands followed in 1974, making Aglow an international “network of caring women.”

Cindy Faldo-Di Corrado, owner of The Victorian Lady in Sebastian hosted the group’s last gathering featuring guest speaker Joanne Derstines, author, editor and musician from Bradenton, Florida.

“What a beautiful day, the sun is out and there is a cool breeze in the air, and we have all these wonderful ladies here with us to help keep our spirits high, said Glen.

As of 1998, more than 27 nations around the world held conferences drawing crowds well over 20,000. Currently, Aglow can be found in more than 151 nations reaching out to women of every creed, color, and culture, and through them to families worldwide.

The Sebastian Community Aglow meeting is held on the 3rd Saturday of each month at 9:30 a.m. at the Sebastian Library.

Note for student writers:  Let this piece serve as an example of what community newspapers look for as to style and source attribution in a community feature.