The Day After the Day Of

 

The Day After the Day Of

by Paul Ilechko

 

The sky sheds its tears. This morning

is the morning of the day after. The

day of mourning, the day after the day of. 

I beseech the sky to shed tears in order

to wash away the tears on my face.

 

This is the first day of the time after. This is

the beginning of a new time, the days of pain,

the days of sorrow. We are in mourning. The

sky looks down and sheds its tears for us. We

are the sad and mournful people under the sky.

 

Under the sky, the rain washes away the

muddy streaks left by our tears, the dirty

streaks of sadness displayed on the cheeks

of our desperate faces. We are grateful to the

sky. We are grateful for the cleansing rain.

 

The horizontal rain lashes our weary bodies.

The sharp needles of the rain tear into our

soft and needy flesh. This is the time of a

new cruelty. The rain is in the service of the

new age. The rain is a tool of hate and cruelty.

 

The rage of the new day. The anger and hate

turning rain into blood. This is the morning,

the morning after. This is the beginning of the

age of suffering. We beseech the rain to leave

us in peace. The rain laughs in our filthy faces.

 

The rain laughs in our blood-stained faces. We

are the people of the days before. We are under

the influence of the rain, the rain of the day after

the day of. We are overwhelmed by the rage,

the hate, the pain, of the day after the day of. 

 

The Day After the Day Of,  by Paul Ilechko, poetry, 2016 election, Paul Ilechko was born in England but has lived most of his life in the USA. He currently lives in Lambertville, NJ with his girlfriend and a cat. He has at various times been a visual artist (painting and photography) and a writer of short fiction, with some level of success in both fields.

Paul has had poetry accepted by Ibis Head Review and the Peacock Journal and short fiction works by Grab-a-Nickel and Xelas magazines. In competitions, he was a finalist at Glimmer Train, and a semi-finalist at both the St Lawrence Book Award and Narrative Magazine. He has participated in group art shows in London, England, as well as in Princeton, New Brunswick and Metuchen (all NJ)

Contact Paul at pilechko@gmail.com

 

 

More Than a Score

 

ACRONYM TO FOLLOW

by Peter Brav

 

Finally

Our Day has come

There’s a Day for everything

For doughnuts, siblings, eight track tapes

Grilled cheese, daughters and sons to work

Encouragement, Alzheimer’s

Coffee, math, chewing gum

Blasphemy, yo-yos

And now finally

One for us

Truly a Day to celebrate

National

Don’t Shoot An Unarmed Brother

Doctor King Not Seeing Progress

George Orwell Laughing

It Is So About the Money

Enough Is Never Enough

Can You Spare A Dime

Or More Time

Freedom Isn’t Free

But It Is Complicated

Day

Acronym to follow

PETER BRAV of Princeton, New Jersey is the author of the novels SNEAKING IN and THE OTHER SIDE OF LOSING, both available on Amazon.
Source:  Baret News Wire

Five and Time

 

FIVE AND TIME
by Peter Brav
 

Woolworth Sit-In

Went to the Woolworth Building

Downtown Manhattan

To return some do-hickey

And enjoy a lime rickey

Maybe join a sit-in

For civil rights of brothers now long dead

Found four thousand dollar square foot condos instead

PETER BRAV of Princeton, New Jersey is the author of the novels SNEAKING IN and THE OTHER SIDE OF LOSING, both available on Amazon.Frank Woolworth opened his first successful Woolworth’s Great Five Cent Store in Lancaster, PA in 1879. The Woolworth Buildingensuing chain of stores with aisles of beauty products and clothing and lunch counters where shoppers might break for
grilled cheese and lime rickeys enjoyed unprecedented success. Frank and his partners reportedly paid $13.5 million in cash to build New York City’s Woolworth Building which opened in 1913, the tallest building in the world until 1930. On February 1, 1960, four students from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University were refused service at stools reserved for whites only at a Greensboro, North Carolina Woolworth’s lunch counter. Their courage, and that of those who joined them in the days that followed, resulted in the desegregation of the lunch counter now housed at the Smithsonian Institution, with the
Greensboro building itself now home to the International Civil Rights Center & Museum. Today more than one hundred years old, New York City’s Woolworth Building is being partially converted to residential condominiums from the 29th Floor up where individual apartment prices range from $3.9 million to $110 million. 

Source:  Baret News Wire

Walk on White, Thursday March 20th 2014

 

For our March Walk on White, we will be feauring works by Elizabeth Devries, Coco Eriksen, Helen Harrison, Vera Vasek, and more of your favorite Harrison Gallery artists.
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Show Opening: Cindy Wilson | Batik: First Show, Second Act

 

Show Opening: Cindy Wilson | Batik: First Show, Second Act

Award-winning graphic artist Cindy Wilson enjoys her “second act” as a batik artist.

 

St. Augustine, Florida – March 7, 2014 – Cindy Wilson, who recently retired from her 30-year career as an award-winning graphic artist and owner of a full-service design and advertising firm, is enjoying her new mantle as a fine artist—an award-winning one at

Eli and Dixie: "Eli and Dixie" by Cindy Wilson depicts a boy and his dog splashing into the waves at the beach.

Eli and Dixie: “Eli and Dixie” by Cindy Wilson depicts a boy and his dog splashing into the waves at the beach.

that. Cindy’s first full show featuring her batik designs opens Friday, April 4, 2014 from 5-9 p.m., at 57 Treasury in downtown St. Augustine as part of Art Galleries of St. Augustine’s (AGOSA) First Friday ArtWalk.

 

A longtime St. Augustine resident and business owner, Wilson studied graphic design at University of North Florida following being hired by Tree of Life—a then-burgeoning natural foods manufacturer—as its original art director. This role set Wilson on a path for specialization in packaging design in particular for the natural foods industry. But for the more than 30 years she owned her own firm, Cindy Wilson Design, she assisted clients throughout the U.S. and in numerous industries with innovative identity and design solutions.

 

In early 2012 Wilson’s husband, Michael, gave his artistic wife a unique birthday gift—a day-long workshop with renowned batik artist, Wendy Tatter. According to Wilson, the media and the master she learned from were a fit. “Wendy is an amazing artist. She is fluid and skillful. I personally have one of her original batiks hanging in my living room,” she said. “The day I worked with her, she walked me through the steps to create three pieces from conception to completion. It was an invaluable learning experience.”

 

Following that session, Wilson continued to practice and experiment creating batik fabric art. She made a space in her studio office

where she could practice applying the molten mixture of beeswax and paraffin onto fabric to create the lines of her “paintings”.

Morgan Surfing: Artist Cindy Wilson's athletic granddaughter is the subject of "Morgan Surfing"

Morgan Surfing: Artist Cindy Wilson’s athletic granddaughter is the subject of “Morgan Surfing”

The waxed areas resist dyes which Wilson applies to create areas of color. The wax is removed by placing the fabric between two layers of paper and ironing repeatedly. Layer upon layer, Wilson adds image and color in this way until the desired effect is achieved.

 

Wilson enjoyed adding batiks to her artistic life, for her own enjoyment, and created paintings with themes and subjects from her personal life—her grandchildren, the beach, her garden, the flora and fauna surrounding their 13-acre farm in Elkton. “I really had no agenda as I first starting exploring the art of making batiks. I just enjoyed doing it and kept my initial works cloistered except to my closest circle of friends and family while I was learning and improving.”

 

As 2013 wound down, Wilson officially retired and closed her doors. With encouragement from friends, in November she entered her first juried fine art show—the St. Augustine Art Association’s (SAAA) Viva La Florida. “In these shows, you submit your work for judging and then the committee notifies you if your work was accepted and will be displayed—or if you need to come and pick it up. I had a message from them and thought to myself, ‘Well, they’re probably calling me to come pick it up.’ but the call was to tell

Palmettos: The flora and fauna of Northeast Florida is a favorite subject of batik artist Cindy Wilson as depicted in "Palmettos"

Palmettos: The flora and fauna of Northeast Florida is a favorite subject of batik artist Cindy Wilson as depicted in “Palmettos”

me that my work had been chosen for recognition and ask if I was planning to be at the show opening to receive my award. I was stunned!”  Wilson’s “Burned Pine Forest” won second prize in the show, much to her amazement and the delight of her friends and family. “It was really exciting.”

 

Bolstered by the approval of St. Augustine’s longest established association of artists, Wilson entered another SAAA juried show in December—its Figure and Portrait Show. This time, her batik entitled “Boy’s Flying Diptych” won first prize and her “second act” as a fine artist was officially off to a roaring start.

 

The transition from a graphic artist to a batik artist is less of a leap than one might think, at least according to Wilson. “I think batiks have a very graphic look,” she says. “You have to break images down into shapes and colors. The process of creating colors through a series of dipping the cloth into colored dye baths takes a lot of thought and planning.” It’s the kind of analytical thinking a graphic artist does constantly. “I have to say I really love the element of surprise at the end when the final dips complete an image—often in surprising ways. I am also really enjoying the freedom of not having to get client approvals on everything I create. I am now free to create with just my own preferences and instincts.”

 

With more time to focus on batiks, Wilson has created a body of work that will be on display and for sale at the April show at 57 Treasury. Owner Karin Sufalko, a longtime friend of Wilson, is pleased to host Wilson’s first show. “I like to display the work of

emerging artists,” says Sufalko. “That the talented emerging artist featured in our April show is also a great friend is a joy.” 57 Treasury is located at 144 King Street in St Augustine. The show will kick off with a reception from 5 to 9 p.m. on April 4 as part of AGOSA’s April First Friday ArtWalk and be on display through end of May. For more information about the show call 57 Treasury at (904) 827-1707.

 

 

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Tampa Bay Photo Shootout

Calling all photographers!  Join us for the Tampa Bay Photo Shootout in St. Petersburg, Florida being held from April 4- 6, 2014.  This event brings photographers from across the country together for photography, education, sightseeing, camaraderie and fun.  Attendees will participate in four photography workshops of their choice, a keynote presentation by Jim Clark, two special lunchtime sessions and an optional portfolio review.  There are 46 workshops to choose from with a large variety of photography subjects and techniques including birds, primates, landscapes, an old western town, cowboy mounted shooting, street photography, macro, lightpainting, time-lapse, reptiles, trains, classic cars, portraits and more.   This event iwill be held at the Pinellas Technical Education Centers (PTEC), St. Petersburg campus.

The first Photo Shootout was held in the Black Hills of South Dakota in 2010 and has grown dramatically since then.  Now in its fifth year, it attracts photographers from across North America and even a few international shutterbugs. It appeals to a broad range of photography enthusiasts, from amateurs to professionals, offering workshops and events suited to a wide range of photography interests and levels.  Why not join us for some fun in the sun!

Online registration is required.  For more information and to register: www.ThePhotoShootout.com/tampa-bay-photo-shootout.  

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