Jerkbaits Often Overlooked as Summer Bass Lures

 

Jerkbaits Often Overlooked as Summer Bass Lures

 

Yamaha Pro Brandon Palaniuk Fishes Jerkbaits Year-Round for Quality Bass

Bass tournament fishermen are famous for having “secret” lures they don’t tell anyone about, but Brandon Palaniuk’s secret lure is one that’s in virtually every angler’s tacklebox. The Yamaha Pro’s lure is a jerk bait, but his secret is that he fishes it all year, and he especially likes to use it during the hot summer months.
“Most fishermen think a jerk bait is only effective during the winter, but really, these are lures I use throughout the year. The difference is simply the speed at which I present them. Now during the summer in warm water, I work them really fast, as opposed to cold water where I fish them much more slowly.”

Jerkbaits are a type of crankbait, generally featuring a long, thin five to six-inch body with a diving lip and two or three treble hooks. Instead of retrieving them with steady cranking, anglers point their rod tips down and use a series of jerks and pauses, varying their speed to match the mood of the bass. Jerkbaits have an erratic side to side action and are usually most effective in water depths of less than 12 feet.

“I still use a jerk-jerk-pause cadence in my retrieve, just as I do in cold water,” continues Palaniuk, “but now the pauses are very short, and my lure never really stops moving. It’s constantly darting back and forth, so it probably resembles either a fleeing or an injured baitfish.

“Summer bass have a high metabolism rate, so they’re feeding more aggressively than they do in the winter, which is why the faster retrieve works so well. Bass must think it represents an easy meal, because a lot of quality fish hit it, not just small bass.”

The Yamaha Pro used a jerk bait to help him win the 2013 Bassmaster® Elite tournament on the St. Lawrence River in New York, an event in which he made daily one-way runs of more than 100 miles down the river and out into Lake Ontario. On the final day of the tournament, with the lake extremely rough, he used a jerk bait near a rocky shoreline to cement his winning catch.

“My favorite places to use a jerk bait during the summer are over wide, often featureless flats where bass are roaming rather than relating to any specific cover or structure,” notes the Idaho-based angler, “but when bass are suspended or around cover like standing timber or deeper ridges, I won’t hesitate to use the jerk bait there, too. I prefer to use lighter 10-pound fluorocarbon line because it allows the jerk bait to move freely from side to side, but around heavier cover, I may change to heavier 
12-pound line.

“A jerk bait, especially when fished with a fast retrieve, will often cause bass to show themselves with a quick follow, even if they don’t actually hit it. You can make a quick follow-up cast with a jig or plastic worm and often catch them, and in that sense, a jerk bait is also a perfect lure to use when you’re searching for bass.”

Palaniuk’s favorite color for jerk baits is a hue he calls mossback-shiner, which features a darker back with a lighter silver belly. Pearl-blue is another combination he’s used successfully. Overall, he prefers to fish jerk baits in clearer water where he feels bass are probably feeding by sight; his fast retrieve makes the lure that much more tempting, since fish feel its vibrations but don’t really get a good look at it.

“Jerkbaits will catch bass year-round,” concludes the Yamaha Pro, “and the reason they’re so versatile is because you can easily vary your retrieve speed to match the conditions. I always have one tied on and ready to cast, but among all the Bassmaster® Elite pros, only a few of them fish jerk baits during the summer like I do, and that suits me just fine.” Y

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Original Source:  Yamaha Outboards.com

 

10 Tips for Taking Your Kids Fishing for the First Time

  10 Tips for Taking Your Kids Fishing for the First Time

by Iowa DNR

Whether it’s a passion you’re hoping to pass down to the next generation, or just an idea to get the family out of the house for an afternoon, a fishing trip with your kids can be the stuff memories made of. Keep the experience fun and positive with these handy tips:

  1. Make it fun. The first thing to remember – adults and kids alike – is that this trip is not about catching fish. It’s about learning how to fish and having a good time. If your kids feel like they’re being lectured about how not to do fishing, they’ll tune you out and lose interest. And they won’t want to make a second trip.
  2. Keep it simple with easy-to-use tackle. Just a nightcrawler and bobber is all you need to start. Think small, too – the fish you will likely encounter have mouths about the size of the tip of your finger, so use small hooks, small baits, a quarter-sized bobber and 2- to 4-pound test line.
  3. Give each child a job to do. Giving your child a responsibility will help them feel like an important part of the trip and help keep them focused.
  4. Give your kids your full attention. While it’s hard to not want to throw out a few casts yourself, only do this if your kids are content and comfortable fishing on their own. Otherwise, this is their trip – show them the basics and let them know you’re proud of how they’re doing. And, especially for small children, keep a constant eye, as it’s easy for a little one to fall in quickly – life jackets are always a good idea for shore fishing.
  5. Fish for an easy-to-catch species. Bluegill and crappie are good fish to start with. Check the weekly fishing report before you go for extra help: www.iowadnr.gov/fishingreport.
  6. Go early in the day when kids are most attentive. A fishing trip during a skipped naptime is a recipe for disaster. Aim for a morning trip, so kids are more focused and when temperatures are cooler.
  7. Keep it short. An all-day (or week-long) fishing trip may be heaven for you, but keep in mind that kids have shorter attention spans and may quickly lose interest if the trip gets too long. Start with just an hour or two and leave when they start to get fidgety – make sure they remember the positive, fun parts of the trip.
  8. Pack snacks. Avoid a cranky angler by packing a cooler of sandwiches, easy to eat snacks and lots of water. But make sure there’s a restroom nearby!
  9. Dress comfortably for the weather. If you start early in the morning, you’ll likely need to dress in layers – bring a sweatshirt or jacket.
  10. Bring a camera to record memories! Even if they don’t get a fish that day, make sure to get shots of them casting and enjoying the special time spent with you.

Original Source: www.iowadnr.gov

Yamaha Offers More Than Just Outboard Motors

 

Yamaha Offers More Than Just Outboard Motors

FROM FUEL EFFICIENCY AND RELIABILITY IN THEIR MOTORS TO NEW MOTOR PROMOTIONS AND HELM MASTER™, THERE’S A LOT OF GOOD THINGS GOING ON

By George Mitchell

Yamaha Pro Staff

 

Last week I was fishing out of the Miami Beach Marina on a 32 Yellowfin with twin 300 h.p. Yamaha 4.2 Liter V6 four stroke outboards. I spent a good portion of my life fishing South Florida before I moved up the east coast to Jupiter, so going back top Miami was like homecoming weekend for me.

We decided to go reef hopping and fished some of my spots off Box Shoal and Triumph Reef, and it was like old times. We deployed our chum bags, threw the cast net and caught a bunch of live ballyhoo and then put two baits on the surface and two on the bottom. The surface baits caught a bunch of Spanish mackerel and even a big cero mackerel, but it was the mutton snapper we caught on the deep baits that really made it a successful trip.

 

That big Yellowfin with twin 300 h.p. Yamaha 4.2 Liter V6 four strokes had just phenomenal fuel economy. We averaged 2.2 to 2.4 miles per gallon each day, which is as good as it gets on a boat that size with twin outboards.

We didn’t catch any huge muttons, but we caught a good number of nice ones. We caught three or four mutton snapper each day, which is a pretty productive day on the water.

At the end of the week, I took my son Eddie and some of his friends out of Jupiter Inlet to fish an area to the north off Hobe Sound called Pecks Lake, where the Spanish mackerel just stack up in the winter months. That was nothing less than a blast. We spent two days fishing those Spanish mackerel, which isn’t real tough fishing, but it was fun fishing where you catch a lot of fish.

The next big event I have coming up is the Miami International Boat Show® in Miami Beach, Florida February 13-17. I’ll have my 36 Yellowfin with triple 300 h.p. Yamaha 4.2 Liter V6 four strokes and the Yamaha Helm Master Integrated Digital Control System in the water at the Sea Isle Marina. I’ll be running test rides and showcasing the Yamaha Helm Master Integrated Digital Control System for those that sign up as part of the Yamaha Demo Tour.

Besides being able to see firsthand the performance of the 300 h.p. Yamaha 4.2 Liter V6 four stroke, you can also see the Yamaha Helm Master Integrated Digital Control System put through all the paces. If you take a test ride, you also qualify for some extended warranty packages, so if you’re looking to purchase a boat or Yamaha outboard while at the Miami Boat Show, you definitely want to take advantage of this opportunity. Visit the Yamaha booth (R100) at the Miami Beach Convention Center or stop by the tent at the Sea Isle Marina to schedule a demo ride.

Until the Miami International Boat Show, I’ll be doing a lot of sail fishing out of Jupiter, Florida. The fish are just arriving, and I’ve been using my Yamaha Helm Master Integrated Digital Control to help me deploy the baits and move them into position in front of fish. The Yamaha Helm Master Integrated Digital Control System is compatible with the majority of autopilots on the market, so when I arrive at my fishing spot I’ll put one motor in gear and use the autopilot to maintain my heading, and then use an Autotether wireless kill switch so I can walk to the stern and hook up a bait and deploy it.

 

I always put a balloon on my first bait, and it will be my long flat line bait, and I use it to get a feel for my drift and how the wind and currents are affecting my bait spread. Then I’ll put another bait out tethered through the shoulders, so it will swim down. I’ll freeline that bait.

Once the flatline baits are out, I’ll start putting baits out on the kites. When all the baits are out, then I’ll move back to the helm and disengage the autopilot and use the Yamaha Helm Master Integrated Digital Control System to maneuver the baits left or right, so they’re positioned over any wrecks or structure we want to fish around.

It’s really nice having the autopilot integrating with the Yamaha Helm Master and everything working together so that it only takes on person to operate the boat, deploy the baits and position them to produce the most efficient and effective opportunity to catch a sailfish. From there, it’s up to the fish to find and catch the bait.

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Original Source:  Yamaha Outboards.com 

 

The Best in Waterfowl Hunting with Billy Blakely in Reelfoot, Tennessee

 

The Best in Waterfowl Hunting with Billy Blakely in Reelfoot, Tennessee

 

 

When it comes to the perfect location for the outdoor enthusiast looking for the best in waterfowl hunting, look no further than Blue Banks in Reelfoot, Tennessee. It is here that the menu of hunting, fishing, bird watching packages and more is literally a mile long. Even people who desire to watch the American Bald Eagle in all its majesty head straight to Reelfoot to do just that.

Reelfoot Lake, waterfowl, hunting, Northwest Tennessee, duck season, Blue Banks Resort, VIP Packages, Discovery Park, American Bald Eagle, birdwatching, fishing,

Not only does Reelfoot provide everything from this majestic monarch to waterfowl to all kinds of fish, it also provides one of the finest guides on Reelfoot today. Billy Blakely (although his friends call him “Toothpick”) has over 35 years of experience under his belt when it comes to hunting and fishing in and around the lakes in this stunning Northwest Tennessee area. An expert fisherman and hunter, Billy works exclusively for Blue Banks Resort and has brought back return vacationers again and again because of his skills and talent. As operator of the marina facilities at Blue Banks, he has trained many guides for the resort, while also being featured in over a hundred outdoor TV shows and countless articles and magazines.

 

In other words, when picking Blue Banks for your much-needed vacation, you not only receive the most amazing resort on the lake that provides fine dining and lodging, clean and affordable facilities, as well as hunting/fishing and birdwatching packages, but you also get the best guide in the business.

 

The Reelfoot Bird Blind Packages with Billy Blakely are just one group at the ready. Able to be booked by both resort and non-resort guests, this is most definitely a memorable experience for one and all. From $50/per person to $229/per person, packages include a baited gas heated blind with a kitchen to prepare meals. And when it comes to the VIP Packages, you also receive an overnight stay, three meals, a private viewing of an active Eagle Nest, and tickets to Discovery Park.

 

According to Chief Guide Billy Blakely, he “hunts every single day of duck season,” in his area that is located between three waterfowl refuges and only a short distance from the Mississippi River—one of the premier duck hunting regions in the United States. Guiding 80+ days per year for waterfowl, when Billy takes a party of duck hunters out to Reelfoot Lake for a day of hunting, the party often is made up of 4-to-10 hunters at one time, plus a dog, guns, ammunition and food. Traveling before they set up to hunt, the party is shown two miles of the lake that includes spots of shallow water, deep water, stumps, brush and ice. There is also a stationary blind out on the open water to be used, depending on how the ducks are flying that day.

 

The popularity of waterfowl hunting has grown in numbers over the past few years and continues to widen across the country. From puddle ducks—such as, blue bills, redheads, canvasbacks—to several mallards, Billy Blakely makes sure to provide all visitors with the ‘best of the best’ when it comes to always making the hunt successful.

 

 

Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle

 

Extension of Federal Gulf Red Snapper Season

  Extension of Federal Gulf Red Snapper Season  

The American Sportfishing Association (ASA) supports the U.S. Department of Commerce’s announcement to expand the 2017 private recreational fishing season for Gulf of Mexico red snapper. The plan, which will provide 39 additional days of red snapper fishing in federal waters, was the result of negotiations between the Department of Commerce and the Gulf states to improve recreational access after a record low three-day federal season was implemented earlier in June. Changes would only apply to private recreational anglers – not commercial or charter fishing. “Today’s announcement providing additional Gulf red snapper fishing days is a welcome relief for the thousands of tackle shops, marinas, equipment manufacturers and other businesses who have suffered from decreasing public access to Gulf red snapper in recent years,” said Mike Leonard, ASA’s Conservation director. “We greatly appreciate the leadership of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Reps. Steve Scalise (R-La.), Garret Graves (R-La.) and Austin Scott (R-Ga.) along with the Gulf states’ marine fisheries agencies’ directors for working diligently to pursue this action.” The original 2017 recreational red snapper season in Gulf federal waters was held June 1-3. The extended season will be 39 days total, consisting of three-day weekends (FridaySunday) fromFriday, June 16 through Monday, September 4. Fishing will also be allowed on Monday and Tuesday, July 3-4 and Monday, September 4. In exchange for these additional fishing days, red snapper harvest will not be allowed in state or federal waters on Monday through Thursday during the summer (with the exception of holidays). Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas may have additional fishing days in state waters in the fall depending on harvest estimates from the summer season. “We appreciate this immediate action to extend the 2017 red snapper season, but recognize that there’s much more work to be done,” noted Leonard. “ASA will continue to push for long-term solutions for the federal fisheries management system as a whole, and Gulf red snapper specifically, to better achieve conservation goals and public access.”   Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

Aries Wins 2017 Mississippi Gulf Coast Billfish Classic

 

Aries Wins 2017 Mississippi Gulf Coast Billfish Classic

With 668.77-Pound Blue Marlin

 

Biloxi, Mississippi:

Aries is the first sign in zodiac astrology and is associated with energy and fire. Those traits also apply to Team Aries, which earned the top tournament award in the 2017 Mississippi Gulf Coast Billfish Classic that concluded Sunday morning. Owner/captain Russell Craft, angler Jeff Friedman and family members Jason, Matthew and Darin Friedman, brought the largest marlin to the scales—a 668.77-pound blue marlin—that topped the next challenger by less than 15 pounds. For its efforts, the team is taking $397,925 home to Perdido Key, Florida. In true Aries spirit, the team was the first boat entered for the 21st-annual event when it signed up last fall.

 

“We love fishing this tournament,” Jeff Friedman says. “Bobby [Tournament Director Bobby Carter] and his crew do a fantastic job, the Golden Nugget is a great venue, and we always enjoy the camaraderie and sportsmanship that’s on display here.”

 

Aries’ blue was boated with the fish’s bill broken off. That will sometimes occur naturally, or it could happen during the fight. After a lengthy and thorough review process, the tournament committee ruled that the bill had broken by slamming into the boat’s hull (76 Viking) and allowed the catch to stand. Hollis Legg is the Aries mate.

 

Mollie, a 68 G&S based in Destin, Florida and run by Capt. Jeff Shoults took second-place honors but the most money. Thomas Cornelison and his teammates earned a payout of $403.005 for the second-largest blue (654.52 pounds), top release team (four blues) and optional entries. Mollie is a perennial contender on the highly competitive Gulf big-game circuit and nearly pulled off another win at this year’s Classic.

 

Born2Run is no stranger to the awards stage either and angler Dana Foster, Capt. Myles Colley and crew won the third place tournament award with a 563.92 blue. The 72 Viking based in Pensacola, Florida, also scored 1,800 points in the release division for a combined payout of $242,940. Reel Addiction, a 56 Viking from Pensacola Beach and run by Capt. Scooter Porto, took third-place billfish release honors (1,800 points based on time) and $70,380. Other boats winning optional billfish money included Wild Hooker and A Work of Art. Double J (553.43) and Breathe Easy (501.43) came in fourth and fifth, respectively, in the marlin weight division. The tournament established a new minimum length of 107 inches this year (LJFL) to promote billfish conservation.

 

The leaderboard was constantly changing throughout the tournament due to the hotly contested swordfish division. Every weighed sword easily shattered the existing Mississippi record of 75 pounds. By the time the scales closed Saturday night, Pay Dirt, a 37 Freeman based in Tallahassee, Florida, was the big winner. Angler Scott Cothran, Capt. Ryan Kelly and the veteran team boated a 242.54-pound broadbill to earn top tournament honors and a check for $51.075.

 

Their catch must now be verified by the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, a process that should take a few weeks. If it is certified as expected, Pay Dirt will earn an additional payout of $325,000 plus a Petro Nissan Titan pick-up. Freeman Boatworks, Hilton’s Realtime Navigator, Killer Bee Bait, Poseidon Total Fishing Outfitters and Marsh Tacky Carbon were the special swordfish promotional sponsors, along with the MGCBC.

 

Shockwave, a 42 Freeman (Capt. Richard Draper), was the top swordfish release boat with 7 points or one point per fish for a $9,000 check. Metal Shark 42 was second with four releases ($6,300), followed by Ellie B, also with four fish. Other boats earning money for swordfish in the optional or release divisions include Titan Up ($29,280), Wild Bill ($12,870), Burst Factor ($10,125), Ellie B ($9,180), Peacekeeper ($8,100), Sea Cruiser Tails Up ($6,570), Cajun Odyssey ($7,850) and Change Order ($5,400).

 

The tuna division was a seesaw battle all Saturday night as the 120-boat fleet returned to the Point Cadet Marina in Biloxi. Fourteen-year-old Ryan Cooper on CE outlasted the top yellowfin, a rotund fish that tipped the scales at 201.06 pounds. That fish earned an $81,360 payout. Capt. George Crenshaw is the skipper of the 63 Hatteras based in Point Clear, Alabama. Another teenager, Drew Marshall, fishing aboard his family’s 105-foot Broward Trader’s Hill, whipped a tuna that scaled 185.29 pounds, worth $81,360. Capt. Billy Blount is the captain of Trader’s Hill, which home-ports in Bay Point, Florida. Still another junior angler, Dylan Doubleday, fishing aboard Makaira (53 Hatteras/Capt. BJ Teems), landed the third-biggest tuna of the tournament. That fish weighed 176.55 pounds, good for $17,490.

 

Owner Neal Foster and his Intense team, fishing aboard a 39 Contender, ran nearly 1,000 miles round-trip to scale the top two wahoo, 80.13 and 72.7 pounds. Foster, of Mobile, Alabama, and his crew won $112,200 for their marathon efforts. A Work of Art (93 Viking) captured third place wahoo honors with a 60.82-pounder wound in by Greg Cooper. Capt. Ron Woodruff, owner Art Favre, and the team won $61,590 for that fish, billfish release and a 145.95-pound yellowfin options. Emily Landry (Bons Amis) also earned $3,960 for a 58.4 ‘hoo.

 

Angler Brian Leiser, Capt. Jeff Theory and the Orange Beach, Alabama, team aboard Hot, Black and Sticky (60 Hatteras) won the most money per pound by sweeping the dolphin division. With no other fish meeting the 20-pound minimum, Leiser, and Company took home an impressive $108,000 for their 42.97-pound bull.

 

 

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Propane vs. Gas: The Camper’s Debate

 

Propane vs. Gas: The Camper’s Debate

 

Although they say every “opinion” is worth about two cents nowadays (and if you’re career happens to be in politics it’s worth even less) there are some definite facts that come along with choosing what is easier and better, between propane and gas, to use in the Great Outdoors.

 

backpacking, environment, summer, travel, propane, white gas, hunting, camping, fuel options, bio-fuels

Let us begin with the issue of ease. It is absolutely true that propane is one of the easiest fuel sources to use. After all, you screw in the container, turn on the valve, and simply light the gas that’s exiting the burners; how much more ease can you ask for? Seeing as that propane is already under pressure, you do not have to pump it or do anything special. When you’re talking about white gas (Coleman fuel), you have to pump the container up, heat up a bit of the fuel, and then ignite it. So it obviously takes more time in the set up and start up categories than when speaking about a propane stove.

 

Propane stoves for the camper also provide the benefit of ease when it comes to transportation. There is no need to worry about filling it up, spilling fuel by mistake, or priming the stove, which makes it more fun and less of a chore for the individual when it comes to enjoying their camping experience.

 

Although this is starting to sound like propane runs away with the race, it is important to note that even with all the benefits, propane does have some definite problems that you will encounter with gas stoves. Propane is not able to be used in very low temperatures. Say you’re looking at a forty degree hunting/camping/fishing weekend. Or maybe you are an ice fishing lover and will sit in 0 degree weather or less; if that is the case, propane is definitely off your list and white gas is the one and only choice.

 

If we’re talking about backpacking instead of driving that RV or camper up to your site, propane also is not the one you want to go with. Although it’s easy to transport, that benefit falls apart when talking about throwing it into your backpack for the long trek. Propane containers are heavy and they are not disposable. Seeing as that garbage cans can usually not be discovered on top of the mountain, you will also be forced to carry those containers back down with you. When it comes to gas containers, they are lighter and smaller, which makes the backpacker far happier.

 

In addition, when it comes to refilling the propane canister – the small ones, that is – you will be unable to. You will be forced, instead, to trash them in a landfill, whereas white gas stove containers can simply be refilled.

 

When you get down to the brass tacks of cooking, another issue also crops up when speaking about cooking with propane. Simply put, when propane burns, heat, light, carbon dioxide, and water are produced. When the water vapor comes in contact with your food it alters the taste ever so slightly. This is why many choose to use charcoal to cook instead of propane, because the briquettes offer a great flavor to the food.

 

Keep in mind that there are three types of stoves to choose from: Canister stoves, which are easy-to-use, low-maintenance stoves that typically screw onto the threaded tops of self-sealing fuel canisters that contain two pre-pressurized gases (isobutane and propane). Liquid fuel stoves, which are extremely versatile stoves that connect to refillable fuel bottles, not only white gas. And, last but not least, Alternative-fuel stoves that is a category that continues to grow bigger with each passing year. More and more backpacking and camping stoves are being made that run on fuel pellets or actual wood.

 

Make sure that the size, ease of transportation, and the ability to run the stove in certain temperature are all issues you take into account before choosing what is right for you. Whereas propane might be perfect for that family camping trip, your backpacking excursion most certainly will call for the smaller, easier to carry gas options.

 

But no matter what, keep those Great Outdoors safe and have one heck of a trip!

 

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle

For Over 80 Years H&M Landing Has Defined the World of Sportfishing

 

For Over 80 Years H&M Landing Has Defined the World of Sportfishing

 

When speaking about the ‘best’ fishing guides in the gorgeous oasis of San Diego, California, the name H&M Landing is at the top of the list and has been (believe it or not) since 1934.

sportfishing, San Diego, California, fishing, guides, H&M Landing, Harbor Water Taxi, West Coast, Coronado Islands, marine wildlifeIt was way back when that two partners in a company called Harbor Water Taxi took one of those rare, much-needed days off from work for a little rest and relaxation, and set out on the water to do a little marlin fishing. What happened, however, was more than just a day of rest – it was a day where these two particular men got “hooked” on the sport and began to seriously contemplate founding their own sportfishing company. The very next year, in 1935, they went with their dream and H&M Sport Fishing Company was born.

 

Here we are in the 21st Century and H&M is now called H&M Landing Company and its’ fleet has held its position as being the West Coast’s oldest, most experienced and diversified sportfishing company for over 80 years and counting.

 

When we talk “fleet,” we’re not kidding around here. H&M has one of the finest charter boat fleets in the entire world. One of their private charters can accommodate any group, any size. Offering a full range of open party trips, H&M can even customize charter itineraries to suit everyone’s needs – whether the trip be for business, family, or (as it was in the beginning) simply two friends who want to enjoy the beauty of San Diego while catching those marlin.

 

On the highly detailed H&M website that will literally have any sportfishing lover drooling, you can see this amazing fleet that’s at the ready. From A to V in this case, they have a wide variety of boats to choose from. ‘A’ is for Alicia which sleeps 14 (10 bunks provided/single and double). 46 X 15, the owner is a guide that will bring to you one of the most memorable fishing trips you have ever experienced. The ‘V’ in this fleet is for Vendetta and is 45 x 14. Owner Ray Summer is one of the ‘best of the best’ when it comes to fishing guides, but where H&M is concerned that is the norm.

sportfishing, San Diego, California, fishing, guides, H&M Landing, Harbor Water Taxi, West Coast, Coronado Islands, marine wildlife

Just to give you a little detail, the trips offered are various and many. 1/2 day fishing trips have you fishing the coastline from Imperial Beach to the Point Loma kelp beds, or Mexican Waters according to the “best bite” out there. Depending on the season, the game fish that are available to catch look like the best ‘menu’ any seafood restaurant could offer: yellowtail, calico bass, sand bass, barracuda, bonito, mackerel and rock fish.

 

H&M also has 3/4 day fishing trips available that lead you to either the Coronado Islands in Mexican Waters or offshore areas in US waters. These are perfect trips for those on a tight schedule, providing you and your friends with a full day of fishing while taking up less than a full day. In the spring, summer and fall, trips target surface game fish (yellowtail, white sea bass, barracuda, bonito, and calico bass); whereas, in the winter, trips focus upon sand bass, rock cod and bottom fish.

 

Multi-day trips ranging from one-and-a-half to three-and-a-half days can be chosen. And when it comes to booking that sportfishing, San Diego, California, fishing, guides, H&M Landing, Harbor Water Taxi, West Coast, Coronado Islands, marine wildlifeperfect trip that allows you to remain in the San Diego paradise for up to 21 days, if you wish, you can choose from the long range fishing trips offering personal service and modern accommodations that can only be found within the H&M Landing fleet.

 

Every vessel is individually owned and operated, which is another way to ensure that you and your guests will receive the highest level of personal service. All trips include luxury aboard accommodations, complete meal service, personal crew attention, live bait, on board fish filleting and even refrigerated fish holds to preserve your catch. All you need to bring is sunscreen and your duffle bag, and you have the blue waters of San Diego – and everything swimming in them – at the ready. H&M even offers the adventurous out there Whale Watching tours that are unbelievably cool, allowing you to observe marine wildlife in their natural environment.

 

So now that you know the absolute perfect sportfishing company out there, it is time to head on over to www.hmlanding.com and book that ultimate trip today. WARNING: Get ready to drool!

 

Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle

Blade Sharpening 101

 

Blade Sharpening 101

 

It may sound like a simple process, but when it comes to sharpening your blade – whether it be a pocket knife, survival blade or other, it is important to know all there is regarding knife honing. After all, you need to be sure that the blade is ready whenever you need it.

honing angles, whetstone, blade grinds, sharp knife, sharpening process, knife honing

There are a variety of blade steels. Different types of blades require different grits and different honing angles to make them the best they can be. In addition, you must also be very aware as to what type of sharpener you are using for the knife you own. As a hunter, you will at times be sharpening that blade in the wild, which means the sharpener you have packed with the rest of your supplies has to be the correct one.

 

Finding the right whetstone can be complicated, but it is the number one part of the knife sharpening process. There is a huge difference between a Flat Grind and a Saber Grind, a water stone and an oil stone, an India Stone and an Arkansas stone, therefore, we begin with the basics.

 

Divided into different groups, whetstone groups consist of naturally occurring stones (Japanese Water Stones; Arkansas Oil Stones) and manmade stones, including India Stones (AKA: silicon carbide). Broken down even further, natural and manmade whetstones are then classified as water stones or oil stones, which means they are meant to be used with either water or oil as a lubricant.

 

Once you understand the whetstones available, you will see that different knives with different types of blade grinds need to be sharpened at different angles in order to achieve the right edge.

 

Knives meant for heavy-duty use generally have Saber Grinds; whereas, knives meant for general purposes have Flat Grinds, and knives meant for hunting generally have Hollow Grinds. Those heavy-duty knives require sharpening at much higher edge bevel angles (25 to 30 degrees) than blades with Flat Grinds or Hollow Grinds. This is an important fact, being that the heavy-duty knife has to withstand the shock generated when the knife is used to chop. By the same token, blades with Hollow Grinds will need to be sharpened at much lower edge bevel angles (10 to 15 degrees). And blades with Flat Grinds will need to be sharpened at angles between the two depending upon the thickness of the blade’s spine.

 

Once you have the information needed on whetstones, grinds, blades and angles, sharpening the blade quickly and extremely well will be easy to do.

 

When sharpening a knife with a Saber Grind made from a softer blade steel, start with a coarse grit and progress to a finer grit. But leave the edge rough because it will dull quickly the next time you use it. For knives with relatively hard blades (i.e., 154-CM, ATS-34, or D2 around 58-63 HRC) with either Flat or Hollow Grinds, start with a medium grit and progress to a fine grit. Last, but not least, if the blade has a Hollow Grind that’s particularly thin, then you might want to polish the cutting edge with an extra-fine grit. But regardless of which type of whetstone you choose, the process of sharpening a knife blade remains the same.

 

To begin, depending on the type of whetstone you are using, you may first need to lubricate it either with water or honing oil.

 

The second step is to grasp the knife by the handle and place the edge against the whetstone at a 10-to-30 degree angle, depending on the thickness, and then slowly move the entire length of the cutting edge across the whetstone while maintaining the same angle. When finished, turn the blade over onto its opposite side and perform the same action. Continue to do this, alternating from side to side, until the edge reaches the desired sharpness.

 

As you can see, the process of sharpening a knife blade actually starts with choosing the correct type of whetstone needed based upon the type of steel the knife’s blade is made from and its grit and hardness. As long as you maintain a consistent angle throughout the entire sharpening process, you will achieve that super sharp cutting edge you’re looking for.

 

Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle

Finding Bass During a Mixed Spawn Season

 

Finding Bass During a Mixed Spawn Season

Yamaha Pro Mark Davis Offers Two Solutions For Catching Bass This Spring

Warmer-than-normal winter temperatures have shuffled bass spawning schedules on many lakes throughout the country this spring, but Mark Davis has seen it before, and the veteran Yamaha Pro knows just how to approach the problem.

“With the milder winter, bass began spawning much earlier than usual this year so when a fisherman heads to a lake this month, he’s probably going to find some bass in post-spawn, others on spawning beds, and even a few still in the pre-spawn stage,” notes Davis, a three-time B.A.S.S.® Angler of the Year and winner of the 1993 Bassmaster Classic.® “The fish are doing a lot of different things, but not a lot of them are doing the same thing.

“It’s a real curve ball, because some bass may be in water only a foot deep while others can be in water 20 feet deep, and the rest of them are somewhere in between.”

The first solution Davis offers for catching some of these fish is for an angler to simply begin fishing the way he wants to fish, using the lures and techniques in which he has the most confidence. 

He should decide which type of spawning fish he wants to catch, choose an area of the lake where that is likely to be happening, and then concentrate entirely on those fish. For example, if he prefers to go after post-spawn bass, Davis suggests looking for slightly deeper water in the 15 to 20-foot range and fishing a deep diving crankbait, a football head jig, or a Carolina rig and staying in that area of a lake.

“If you decide on this approach, you really need to forget about any shallow water bass,” emphasizes the Yamaha Pro, “because if you don’t commit totally to what you’re doing, you’ll never fish as effectively as you need to. Just remember, you’re probably not going to find a lot of bass because they’re so scattered.”

Davis describes his second, completely opposite solution as “junk fishing,” in which a fisherman does work both shallow and deep water. If he sees a potential shallow water target, he can cast to it, then turn and make his next cast toward standing timber in deeper water. He might follow with a third cast ahead of the boat to still another spot. Junk fishing usually involves a lot of running to different places, and it frequently means fishing entirely new water each day. This spring, it’s been a technique used by many of the tournament pros in both Bassmaster® and FLW® events.

“This is how I fished the recent Bassmaster® Elite tournament at Toledo Bend,” Davis admits. “I started the tournament in deep water looking for post-spawn bass, and I caught 24 keepers the first day, but all of them were small fish, and I only weighed in about 12 pounds. You can’t even place in a Toledo Bend event with weights like that, so I changed completely. The rest of the tournament I junk-fished water down to about 10 feet, working shallow for spawning and pre-spawn bass, and I eventually finished 36th overall.

“It wasn’t the way I wanted to fish, but on Toledo Bend, there is a huge bass population, so I actually moved up in the standings each day. On lakes that don’t have a large population of fish, a spring like the one we’re having now can really make fishing difficult.”

Another part of the problem, adds Davis, is the increased fishing pressure bass are receiving now, which also makes them more difficult to catch. Because fish are seeing more lures than ever before, and many are being caught and released multiple times, anglers need to remember to keep trying different lures and retrieves until some combination starts bringing strikes. 

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Original Source; Yamaha Outboards.com